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Externality and framing effects in a bribery experiment

Author

Listed:
  • Abigail Barr
  • Danila Serra

Abstract

Using a simple one-shot bribery game, we find evidence of a negative externality effect and a framing effect. When the losses suffered by third parties due to a bribe being offered and accepted are increased bribes are less likely to be offered and accepted. And when the game is presented as a bribery scenario instead of in abstract terms bribes are less likely to be offered and accepted. We discuss two possible reasons as to why our experiment leads to the identification of these effects while previous experiments did not.

Suggested Citation

  • Abigail Barr & Danila Serra, 2007. "Externality and framing effects in a bribery experiment," CSAE Working Paper Series 2007-16, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  • Handle: RePEc:csa:wpaper:2007-16
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    File URL: http://www.csae.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/2007-16text.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Laura Schechter, 2007. "Theft, Gift-Giving, and Trustworthiness: Honesty Is Its Own Reward in Rural Paraguay," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1560-1582.
    2. James Albrecht & Axel Anderson, 2004. "A Matching Model of the Housing Market: Searching for a Motivated Partner," 2004 Meeting Papers 376, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Gary Charness, University of California, Santa Barbara and Garance Genicot,Georgetown University, 2004. "An Experimental Test of Risk-Sharing Arrangements," Working Papers gueconwpa~04-04-02, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption; Economic experiment; Social preferences;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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