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Industrial Employment, Investment Equipment and Economic Growth

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  • Dellas, Harris

Abstract

The industrialization of labour is the main engine of growth during the early stages of economic development. In less developed countries, equipment investment has played a less important role than non-equipment investment; and it has only proved growth enhancing when it either encountered a substantial industrial labour force or fostered a large increase in the share of industrial employment. These findings draw attention to the effects of investment on the composition of the labour force; and unlike recent claims emphasizing industrialization via equipment investment, they suggest that employment industrialization policies may hold the key to success in the LDC world.

Suggested Citation

  • Dellas, Harris, 2000. "Industrial Employment, Investment Equipment and Economic Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 2523, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2523
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. M. Herrerias & Vicente Orts, 2012. "Equipment investment, output and productivity in China," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 181-207, February.
    2. Maria Jesus Herrerias, 2010. "The Causal Relationship between Equipment Investment and Infrastructures on Economic Growth in China," Frontiers of Economics in China, Higher Education Press, vol. 5(4), pages 509-526, December.
    3. repec:ilo:ilowps:484346 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic Development; Equipment Investment; Industrial Employment; Labour Intensive Technology;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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