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Growth Effects of Income and Consumption Taxes

Author

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  • Milesi-Ferretti, Gian Maria
  • Roubini, Nouriel

Abstract

The effects of income and consumption taxation are examined in the context of models in which the growth process is driven by the accumulation of human and physical capital. The different channels through which these taxes affect economic growth are discussed. It is shown that the effects of taxation on growth depend crucially on whether the sector producing human capital is a market sector, on the technology for human capital accumulation and on the specification of the leisure activity. In general, the taxation of factor incomes (human and physical capital) is growth-reducing, while the effects of a consumption tax depend on the specification of leisure. The paper also derives implications for the growth-maximizing choice of tax instruments.

Suggested Citation

  • Milesi-Ferretti, Gian Maria & Roubini, Nouriel, 1998. "Growth Effects of Income and Consumption Taxes," CEPR Discussion Papers 1979, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1979
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    consumption taxation; Economic Growth; income taxation;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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