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Death, Tetanus and Aerobics: The Evaluation of Disease-Specific Health Interventions

Author

Listed:
  • Holmes, Jessica
  • Philipson, Tomas
  • Sala-i-Martin, Xavier
  • Tahvonen, Olli

Abstract

This paper provides a theoretical and empirical investigation of the positive complementarities between disease-specific policies introduced by competing risks of mortality. The incentive to invest in prevention against one cause of death depends positively on the level of survival from other causes. This means that a specific public health intervention has benefits other than the direct medical reduction in mortality: it affects the incentives to fight other diseases so the overall reduction in mortality will, in general, be larger than that predicted by the direct medical effects. We discuss evidence of these cross-disease effects by using data on neonatal tetanus vaccination through the Expanded Programme on Immunization of the World Health Organization.

Suggested Citation

  • Holmes, Jessica & Philipson, Tomas & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier & Tahvonen, Olli, 1995. "Death, Tetanus and Aerobics: The Evaluation of Disease-Specific Health Interventions," CEPR Discussion Papers 1283, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:1283
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Mark R. Rosenzweig & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 1988. "Heterogeneity, Intrafamily Distribution, and Child Health," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 23(4), pages 437-461.
    2. Philipson, Tomas, 1995. "The welfare loss of disease and the theory of taxation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 387-395, August.
    3. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-255, March-Apr.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Complementarities; Disease-Specific Public Health Interventions; Endogenous Mortality; Tetanus Programmes;

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health

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