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From one crisis to another: a banker's perspective


  • Robert Amzallag


Once the 2009 financial meltdown was avoided through central banks' decisive action and governments' swift bailouts, the general consensus was that the usual recipes that took us back to prosperity and growth after each of the post war recessions should undoubtedly work again. The main tools selected by the authorities were fiscal stimulus, lowering of interest rates combined with monetary easing, politically motivated legislation and high profile chastising to keep the public satisfied that the authorities were extirpating the roots of the problem. These remedies were applied and, for a while, seemed to work: stock prices recovered, the US job market stabilized, bail out money started to be repaid and economic growth, although sluggish, appeared to be well into positive territory. However, two years later, another serious financial crisis unexpectedly struck. There seemed to be no reason for it. Indeed, this had not been the first time we faced a real estate/financial crisis. For example, in 1990, real estate prices went down even more than they have had since 2008. The amounts dedicated to the stimulus packages and monetary easing were unprecedented and imposing pieces of legislation were quickly passed. So how could this have happened? The answer to this question requires a careful analysis of the nature of the 2008 crisis, the then prevailing economic conditions and the relevance of the measures taken.

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  • Robert Amzallag, 2012. "From one crisis to another: a banker's perspective," CIRANO For discussion... 2012dt-01, CIRANO.
  • Handle: RePEc:cir:cirtra:2012dt-01

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    1. Frank H. Fuller & Jikun Huang & Hengyun Ma & Scott Rozelle, 2005. "Rapid Rise of China's Dairy Sector: Factors Behind the Growth in Demand and Supply, The," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 05-wp394, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
    2. Abdessalem Abbassi & Olivier Bonroy & Jean-Philippe Gervais, 2008. "Dairy Trade Liberalization Impacts in Canada," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 56(3), pages 313-335, September.
    3. Roberto Mosheim & C.A. Knox Lovell, 2007. "Scale Economies and Inefficiency of U.S. Dairy Farms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(3), pages 777-794.
    4. Mosheim, Roberto, 2009. "Increasing Size of Dairy Farms Driven by Declining Production Costs," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, December.
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