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Do swing states influence US trade policy?


  • Mirabelle Muûls
  • Dimitra Petropoulou


As the US election campaign nears its climax, Mirabelle Muûls and Dimitra Petropoulou find that industries in battleground states are more likely to be protected.

Suggested Citation

  • Mirabelle Muûls & Dimitra Petropoulou, 2008. "Do swing states influence US trade policy?," CentrePiece - The Magazine for Economic Performance 266, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  • Handle: RePEc:cep:cepcnp:266

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    6. Austan Goolsbee & Jonathan Guryan, 2006. "The Impact of Internet Subsidies in Public Schools," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 336-347, May.
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    8. Ashenfelter, Orley & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Estimates of the Economic Returns to Schooling from a New Sample of Twins," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(5), pages 1157-1173, December.
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    10. Thomas Fuchs & Ludger Wossmann, 2004. "Computers and student learning: bivariate and multivariate evidence on the availability and use of computers at home and at school," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 47(3-4), pages 359-386.
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