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Regional Versus Local Accessibility: Neo-Traditional Development and Its Implications for Non-work Travel

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  • Handy, Susan L.

Abstract

The question of how particular forms of metropolitan development affect travel patterns has long been of concern to planners but has recently been at the centre of a heated debate. Much of this debate has focused on the effects of suburbanization in particular, with some arguing that the decentralization of housing and jobs reduces overall travel (for example Gordon et al., 1989; 1991) and most others arguing that the low-density development that is associated with decentralization leads to more automobile travel and gasoline consumption (for example Newman and Kenworthy, 1989; 1992). The debate has taken on a very practical form in proposals that address the problem of growing levels of travel, particularly non-work travel, by changing the way in which individual suburbs are designed. The sprawling, low-density suburban development that has proliferated in recent decades in the United States is defined as the problem and a new approach to design is put forth as the solution. This approach is commonly dubbed 'neo-traditional development'. Despite the popularity of the neo-traditional concept, the evidence on how effective these developments will be at reducing non-work travel is limited. This paper begins to remedy this situation, by providing both a framework through which these proposals must be evaluated and evidence from case studies of four communities within the San Francisco Bay Area as to the relationship between alternative forms of suburban development and the travel patterns of suburban residents. The question addressed is whether 'traditional' suburban forms engender less non-work travel than alternative forms, and the answer is ambiguous.

Suggested Citation

  • Handy, Susan L., 1992. "Regional Versus Local Accessibility: Neo-Traditional Development and Its Implications for Non-work Travel," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7gs0p1nc, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt7gs0p1nc
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ritchie, Stephen G., 1990. "A Knowledge-Based Decision Support Architecture for Advanced Traffic Management," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7qv4w8kj, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Ritchie, Stephen G., 1990. "A Knowledge- Based Decision Support Architecture for Advanced Traffic Management," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9818b161, University of California Transportation Center.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mondschein, Andrew Samuel, 2012. "The Personal City: The Experimental, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt67d5w48s, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Xinyu Cao & Patricia L Mokhtarian & Susan L Handy, 2007. "Cross-Sectional and Quasi-Panel Explorations of the Connection between the Built Environment and Auto Ownership," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 39(4), pages 830-847, April.
    3. Thirayoot Limanond & Debbie Niemeier, 2004. "Effect of land use on decisions of shopping tour generation: A case study of three traditional neighborhoods in WA," Transportation, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 153-181, May.
    4. Park, Sungjin, 2008. "Defining, Measuring, and Evaluating Path Walkability, and Testing Its Impacts on Transit Users’ Mode Choice and Walking Distance to the Station," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt0ct7c30p, University of California Transportation Center.
    5. David Philip McArthur & Inge Thorsen & Jan Ubøe, 2014. "Employment, transport infrastructure, and rural depopulation: a new spatial equilibrium model," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 46(7), pages 1652-1665, July.
    6. Handy, Susan, 1993. "A Cycle of Dependence: Automobiles, Accessibility, and the Evolution of the Transportation and Retail Hierarchies," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt15g4c2j8, University of California Transportation Center.
    7. Sallis, James F. & Frank, Lawrence D. & Saelens, Brian E. & Kraft, M. Katherine, 2004. "Active transportation and physical activity: opportunities for collaboration on transportation and public health research," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 249-268, May.
    8. Cervero, Robert, 1996. "Mixed land-uses and commuting: Evidence from the American Housing Survey," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 361-377, September.
    9. Cao, XinYu, 2007. "The Causal Relationship between the Built Environment and Personal Travel Choice: Evidence from Northern California," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt1n90z8h8, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    10. Cao, Xinyu, 2006. "The Causal Relationship between the Built Environment and Personal Travel Choice: Evidence from Northern California," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt07q5p340, University of California Transportation Center.
    11. Ferrell, Christopher Erin, 2005. "The Effects of Teleshopping on Travel Behavior and Urban Form," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7911x32b, University of California Transportation Center.
    12. Guerra, Erick Strom, 2013. "The New Suburbs: Evolving travel behavior, the built environment, and subway investments in Mexico City," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt88t7k9p5, University of California Transportation Center.
    13. Guerra, Erick Strom, 2013. "The New Suburbs: Evolving travel behavior, the built environment, and subway investment in Mexico City," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4hf3b46g, University of California Transportation Center.
    14. Genevieve Giuliano, 2000. "Land Use Policy and Transportation: Why We Won't Get There from Here," Working Paper 8649, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
    15. Haugen, Katarina & Vilhelmson, Bertil, 2013. "The divergent role of spatial access: The changing supply and location of service amenities and service travel distance in Sweden," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 10-20.
    16. Handy, Susan L, 2002. "Accessibility- vs. Mobility-Enhancing Strategies for Addressing Automobile Dependence in the U.S," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt5kn4s4pb, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    17. Crane, Randall, 1995. "On Form Versus Function: Will the "New Urbanism" Reduce Traffic or Increase It?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7bj9g6bg, University of California Transportation Center.
    18. Crane, Randall & Crepeau, Richard, 1998. "Does Neighborhood Design Influence Travel?: Behavioral Analysis of Travel Diary and GIS Data," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4pj4s7t8, University of California Transportation Center.
    19. Reilly, Michael & Landis, John, 2003. "The Influence of Built-Form and Land Use on Mode Choice," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt46r3k871, University of California Transportation Center.
    20. Mondschein, Andrew Samuel, 2013. "The Personal City: The Experiential, Cognitive Nature of Travel and Activity and Implications for Accessibility," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7014d9cg, University of California Transportation Center.
    21. Schwanen, Tim & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 1998. "Does Dissonance Between Desired and Current Residential Neighbourhood Type Affect Individual Travel Behaviour? An Empirical Assessment From the San Francisco Bay Area," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt26k8w6xf, University of California Transportation Center.
    22. Giuliano, Genevieve, 2003. "Travel, location and race/ethnicity," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 351-372, May.

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