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Do Highways Matter? Evidence and Policy Implications of Highways' Influence on Metropolitan Development

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  • Boarnet, Marlon G.
  • Haughwout, Andrew F.

Abstract

Growing concerns about traffic congestion and rapid suburban expansion (also known as sprawl) have reignited interest in the ways in which highway spending affects metropolitan growth patterns. This discussion paper extracts the best evidence to date on how highway investments distribute growth and economic activity across metropolitan areas. The paper also offers ideas on how transportation financing and policies can better respond to the various costs and benefits of highway projects in a region.

Suggested Citation

  • Boarnet, Marlon G. & Haughwout, Andrew F., 2000. "Do Highways Matter? Evidence and Policy Implications of Highways' Influence on Metropolitan Development," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt5rn9w6bz, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt5rn9w6bz
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    Cited by:

    1. Jeffrey Thompson, 2010. "Prioritizing Approaches to Economic Development in New England: Skills, Infrastructure, and Tax Incentives," Published Studies priorities_september7_per, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    2. Andrew F. Haughwout, 2001. "Infrastructure and social welfare in metropolitan America," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Dec, pages 1-16.
    3. Kristopher D. White & M. Hanink, 2004. ""Moderate" Environmental Amenities and Economic Change: The Nonmetropolitan Northern Forest of the Northeast U.S., 1970-2000," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(1), pages 42-60.
    4. Louw, Erik & Leijten, Martijn & Meijers, Evert, 2013. "Changes subsequent to infrastructure investments: Forecasts, expectations and ex-post situation," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 107-117.
    5. Torben Holvad & John Preston, 2005. "Road Transport Investment Projects and Additional Economic Benefits," ERSA conference papers ersa05p522, European Regional Science Association.
    6. Geza Toth, 2006. "Centre-Periphery Analysis About the Hungarian Public Road System," ERSA conference papers ersa06p11, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Kang, Chang Deok & Cervero, Robert, 2008. "From Elevated Freeway to Linear Park: Land Price Impacts of Seoul, Korea's CGC Project," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt81r021w2, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    8. Mehmet Aldonat Beyzatlar & Mehmet Yeşim Kuştepeli, 2011. "Infrastructure, Economic Growth and Population Density in Turkey," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 4(3), pages 39-57, December.
    9. Michael L. Lahr & Rodrigo Duran & Anupa Varughese, 2004. "Estimating the Impact of Highways on Average Travel Velocities and Market Size," Urban/Regional 0403009, EconWPA.
    10. Miller, John S. & Hoel, Lester A. & Ellington, David B., 2009. "Can highway investment policies influence regional growth?," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 165-176, September.
    11. Wanpen Charoentrakulpeeti & Edsel Sajor & Willi Zimmermann, 2006. "Middle‐class Travel Patterns, Predispositions and Attitudes, and Present‐day Transport Policy in Bangkok, Thailand," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(6), pages 693-712, April.
    12. Yu, Nannan & de Roo, Gert & de Jong, Martin & Storm, Servaas, 2016. "Does the expansion of a motorway network lead to economic agglomeration? Evidence from China," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 218-227.
    13. Plaut, Pnina O & Deakin, Elizabeth, 2006. "Economic and Travel Impacts of Bypass Roads: A Comparative Study of Israel and the U.S," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt6711w6z7, University of California Transportation Center.
    14. Handy, Susan L, 2002. "Accessibility- vs. Mobility-Enhancing Strategies for Addressing Automobile Dependence in the U.S," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt5kn4s4pb, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    15. Melanie Rapino & Benjamin Spaulding & Dean M. Hanink, 2006. "Have Per Capita Earnings and Income Converged across New England?," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(4), pages 620-637.
    16. Cervero, Robert & Kang, Chang Deok, 2009. "Bus Rapid Transit Impacts on Land Uses and Land Values in Seoul, Korea," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings qt4px4n55x, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.

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