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Convergence in adaptation to climate change: Evidence from high temperatures and mortality, 1900-2004

Author

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  • Barreca, A
  • Clay, K
  • Deschênes, O
  • Greenstone, M
  • Shapiro, JS

Abstract

This paper combines panel data on monthly mortality rates of US states and daily temperature variables for over a century (1900-2004) to explore the regional evolution of the temperature-mortality relationship and documents two key findings. First, the impact of extreme heat on mortality is notably smaller in states that more frequently experience extreme heat. Second, the difference in the heat-mortality relationship between hot and cold states declined over 1900-2004, though it persisted through 2004. Continuing differences in the mortality consequences of hot days suggests that health motivated adaptation to climate change may be slow and costly around the world.

Suggested Citation

  • Barreca, A & Clay, K & Deschênes, O & Greenstone, M & Shapiro, JS, 2015. "Convergence in adaptation to climate change: Evidence from high temperatures and mortality, 1900-2004," University of California at Santa Barbara, Recent Works in Economics qt7rd2f6vk, Department of Economics, UC Santa Barbara.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:ucsbrw:qt7rd2f6vk
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    Cited by:

    1. Li, Chengzheng & Cong, Jiajia & Yin, Lijuan, 2021. "Extreme heat and exports: Evidence from Chinese exporters," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C).
    2. Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga & Solomin, Pavel, 2017. "Health Consequences of the Russian Weather," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 290-306.
    3. Cui, X., 2018. "Adaptation to Climate Change: Evidence from US Acreage Response," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277094, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    4. W. J. W. Botzen & M. L. Martinius & P. Bröde & M. A. Folkerts & P. Ignjacevic & F. Estrada & C. N. Harmsen & H. A. M. Daanen, 2020. "Economic valuation of climate change–induced mortality: age dependent cold and heat mortality in the Netherlands," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 162(2), pages 545-562, September.
    5. Karlsson, Martin & Ziebarth, Nicolas R., 2018. "Population health effects and health-related costs of extreme temperatures: Comprehensive evidence from Germany," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 93-117.
    6. Charles D. Kolstad & Frances C. Moore, 2019. "Estimating the Economic Impacts of Climate Change Using Weather Observations," NBER Working Papers 25537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Taraz, Vis, 2018. "Can farmers adapt to higher temperatures? Evidence from India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 205-219.
    8. Casey J. Wichman, 2018. "Interpreting nonlinear semi-elasticities in reduced-form climate damage estimation," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 148(4), pages 641-648, June.
    9. Bassino, Jean-Pascal & Lagoarde-Segot, Thomas & Woitek, Ulrich, 2020. "The irreversible welfare cost of climate anomalies. Evidence from Japan (1872-1917)," Discussion Paper Series 704, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    10. Lu, Jiajun, 2020. "Household residential location choice in retirement: The role of climate amenities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 84(C).
    11. Masiero, Giuliano & Mazzonna, Fabrizio & Santarossa, Michael, 2021. "The Effect of Absolute versus Relative Temperature on Health and the Role of Social Care," IZA Discussion Papers 14201, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Joshua Graff Zivin & Matthew E. Kahn, 2016. "Industrial Productivity in a Hotter World: The Aggregate Implications of Heterogeneous Firm Investment in Air Conditioning," NBER Working Papers 22962, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Otrachshenko, Vladimir & Popova, Olga & Solomin, Pavel, 2018. "Misfortunes never come singly: Consecutive weather shocks and mortality in Russia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 249-258.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics; Commerce; Management; Tourism and Services; Commerce; Management; Tourism and Services;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • N31 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • N32 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-
    • N51 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - U.S.; Canada: Pre-1913
    • N52 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - U.S.; Canada: 1913-
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

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