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The Future of Telecommuting

Author

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  • Handy, Susan
  • Mokhtarian, Patricia

Abstract

Interest in telecommuting is growing among workers, employers, transportation planners, communities, the telecommunications industry, and others. But actual levels of telecommuting appear to be increasing slowly, although there is little reliable data on trends. The future of telecommuting depends on whether employers provide the opportunity to telecommute and whether workers take advantage of this opportunity; government policies can encourage both. This article addresses that future by outlining and evaluating important trends in a variety of factors and explores the need for further research on telecommuting trends and impacts. For the most part the future of telecommuting looks promising, but many questions remain about how telecommuting will evolve over time.

Suggested Citation

  • Handy, Susan & Mokhtarian, Patricia, 1996. "The Future of Telecommuting," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt5nm777c1, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:itsdav:qt5nm777c1
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    Cited by:

    1. Rognes, Jon, 2002. "Telecommuting resistance, soft but strong: Development of telecommuting over time, and related rhetoric, in three organisations," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Business Administration 2002:1, Stockholm School of Economics.
    2. Golob, Thomas F., 2002. "travelbehavior.com - Activity Approaches to Modeling the Effects of Information Technology on Personal Travel Behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt9t40s1mc, University of California Transportation Center.
    3. Golob, Thomas F. & Regan, Amelia C., 2001. "Impacts of Information Technology on Personal Tavel and Commercial Vehicle Operations: Research Challenges and Opportunities," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt95r7j7vk, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Patricia Mokhtarian & Ilan Salomon & Sangho Choo, 2005. "Measuring the Measurable: Why can’t we Agree on the Number of Telecommuters in the U.S.?," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 39(4), pages 423-452, August.
    5. Mokhtarian, Patricia L. & Salomon, Ilan & Saxena, Somitra & Sampath, Srikanth & Cheung, Peter & Le, Kate & Bagley, Michael, 1996. "Adoption of Telecommuting in Two California State Agencies," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2v63b7b8, University of California Transportation Center.
    6. Mokhtarian, Patricia L & Salomon, Ilan & Choo, Sangho, 2004. "Data and Measurement Issues in Transportation, With Telecommuting as a Case Study," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt9pt8s9jv, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    7. Ben-Elia, Eran & Alexander, Bayarma & Hubers, Christa & Ettema, Dick, 2014. "Activity fragmentation, ICT and travel: An exploratory Path Analysis of spatiotemporal interrelationships," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 56-74.
    8. Golob, Thomas F. & Regan, A C, 2000. "Impacts of Information Technology on Personal Travel and Commercial Vehicle Operations: Research Challenges and Opportunities," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt0zh556db, University of California Transportation Center.
    9. Simone T. A. Phipps & Leon C. Prieto, 2016. "A Discovery of Early Labor Organizations and the Women who Advocated Work–Life Balance: An Ethical Perspective," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 134(2), pages 249-261, March.
    10. Safirova, Elena, 2002. "Telecommuting, traffic congestion, and agglomeration: a general equilibrium model," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 26-52, July.
    11. Bayarma Alexander & Martin Dijst & Dick Ettema, 2010. "Working from 9 to 6? An analysis of in-home and out-of-home working schedules," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(3), pages 505-523, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    telecommuting; future; evolution;

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