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Liquidity Effects due to Information Costs from Changes in the FTSE 100 List

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  • A. Gregoriou
  • CHRISTOS IOANNIDIS

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Abstract

In this paper we examine effect on the returns of firms that have been included to and deleted from the FTSE 100 over the time period of 1984-2001. Like the S&P 500 listing studies, we find that the price and trading volume of newly listed (deleted) firms increases (decreases). The evidence is consistent with the information cost/liquidity explanation. This is because investors hold stocks with more (less) available information, consequently implying that they have lower (higher) trading costs. This explains the increase (decrease) in the stock price and trading volume of newly listed (deleted) stocks to (from) the FTSE 100 List.

Suggested Citation

  • A. Gregoriou & CHRISTOS IOANNIDIS, 2003. "Liquidity Effects due to Information Costs from Changes in the FTSE 100 List," Public Policy Discussion Papers 03-02, Economics and Finance Section, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University.
  • Handle: RePEc:bru:bruppp:03-02
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    Cited by:

    1. Tchai Tavor, 2014. "Abnormal investor response to the index effect for daily and intraday data," Financial Markets and Portfolio Management, Springer;Swiss Society for Financial Market Research, vol. 28(3), pages 281-303, August.

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