IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/bol/bodewp/713.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Horizontal and Vertical FDI: a comparative analysis of technological determinants

Author

Listed:
  • C. Franco

Abstract

The study analyzes the role played by technological determinants, using the approach of National System of Innovation (NSI), in enhancing or hampering Foreign Direct Investments (FDI) with different motivations, namely horizontal and vertical FDI. The empirical analysis is carried out using data relative to the final destination of sales of US foreign subsidiaries in 42 host countries grouped according to income criteria. A three step empirical strategy is employed: first, we estimate a benchmark model finding that technological determinants exert a greater influence in high income countries especially for vertical FDI. Secondly, applying a dynamic panel data approach we take into account that agglomeration economies may play a role as well as other FDI determinants. Finally, we are able to further disentangle the destination of sales according to whether they are directed towards other foreign affiliates or to unaffiliated persons recognizing that they are affected by different determinants.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Franco, 2010. "Horizontal and Vertical FDI: a comparative analysis of technological determinants," Working Papers 713, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  • Handle: RePEc:bol:bodewp:713
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://amsacta.unibo.it/4529/1/713.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Amable, Bruno & Demmou, Lilas & Gatti, Donatella, 2007. "Employment Performance and Institutions: New Answers to an Old Question," IZA Discussion Papers 2731, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Belot, Michele & van Ours, Jan C., 2001. "Unemployment and Labor Market Institutions: An Empirical Analysis," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 403-418, December.
    3. Blanchard, Olivier & Wolfers, Justin, 2000. "The Role of Shocks and Institutions in the Rise of European Unemployment: The Aggregate Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 1-33, March.
    4. Roland Beck & Annette Kamps & Elitza Mileva, 2007. "Long-term growth prospects for the Russian economy," Occasional Paper Series 58, European Central Bank.
    5. Bertola, Giuseppe & Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence, 2001. "Comparative Analysis of Labour Market Outcomes: Lessons for the US from International Long-Run Evidence," CEPR Discussion Papers 3023, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Randolph L. Bruno & Riccardo Rovelli, 2010. "Labour Market Policies and Outcomes in the Enlarged EU," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48, pages 661-685, June.
    7. Stephen Nickell & Luca Nunziata & Wolfgang Ochel, 2005. "Unemployment in the OECD Since the 1960s. What Do We Know?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(500), pages 1-27, January.
    8. Eichhorst, Werner & Feil, Michael & Braun, Christoph, 2008. "What Have We Learned? Assessing Labor Market Institutions and Indicators," IZA Discussion Papers 3470, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Giuseppe Fiori & Giuseppe Nicoletti & Stefano Scarpetta & Fabio Schiantarelli, 2007. "Employment Outcomes and the Interaction Between Product and Labor Market Deregulation: Are They Substitutes or Complements?," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 663, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 08 Aug 2008.
    10. Alberto Behar, 2009. "Tax Wedges, Unemployment Benefits and Labour Market Outcomes in the New EU Members," Czech Economic Review, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, vol. 3(1), pages 069-092, March.
    11. Hartmut Lehmann & Jochen Kluve, 2010. "Assessing Active Labour Market Policies in Transition Economies," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore (ed.), The Labour Market Impact of the EU Enlargement. A New Regional Geography of Europe?, edition 1, chapter 11, pages 275-307 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    12. Sandrine Cazes & Alena Nesporova, 2004. "Labour markets in transition: balancing flexibility and security in Central and Eastern Europe," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 91(5), pages 23-54.
    13. Djankov, Simeon & Ramalho, Rita, 2009. "Employment laws in developing countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, pages 3-13.
    14. Boeri, Tito & Lehmann, Hartmut, 1999. "Unemployment and Labor Market Policies in Transition Countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 1-3, March.
    15. Tito Boeri & Katherine Terrell, 2002. "Institutional Determinants of Labor Reallocation in Transition," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 51-76.
    16. Andrea Bassanini & Romain Duval, 2009. "Unemployment, institutions, and reform complementarities: re-assessing the aggregate evidence for OECD countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 40-59, Spring.
    17. Eamets, Raul & Masso, Jaan, 2004. "Labour Market Flexibility and Employment Protection Regulation in the Baltic States," IZA Discussion Papers 1147, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Kamila Fialová & OndÅej Schneider, 2009. "Labor Market Institutions and Their Effect on Labor Market Performance in the New EU Member Countries," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(3), pages 57-83, May.
    19. Horst Feldmann, 2008. "Business regulation and labor market performance around the world," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 201-235, April.
    20. Hartmut Lehmann & Jochen Kluve, 2010. "Assessing Active Labour Market Policies in Transition Economies," AIEL Series in Labour Economics,in: Floro Ernesto Caroleo & Francesco Pastore (ed.), The Labour Market Impact of the EU Enlargement. A New Regional Geography of Europe?, edition 1, chapter 11, pages 275-307 AIEL - Associazione Italiana Economisti del Lavoro.
    21. Howell David R. & Baker Dean & Glyn Andrew & Schmitt John, 2007. "Are Protective Labor Market Institutions at the Root of Unemployment? A Critical Review of the Evidence," Capitalism and Society, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-73, May.
    22. Alexander Muravyev, 2008. "Human capital externalities," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 16(3), pages 415-443, July.
    23. Lehmann, Hartmut & Muravyev, Alexander, 2009. "How Important Are Labor Market Institutions for Labor Market Performance in Transition Countries?," IZA Discussion Papers 4673, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    24. Sjef Ederveen & Laura Thissen, 2007. "Can labour market institutions explain high unemployment rates in the new EU member states?," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 34(4), pages 299-317, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F20 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - General
    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bol:bodewp:713. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/sebolit.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.