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Poverty Traps and Human Capital Accumulation

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  • C. Berti Ceroni

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze the emergence and persistence of poverty traps and study how wide-spread poverty and the unequal distribution of income can slow down the accumulation process and lead to steady-state equilibria characterized by low aggregate output levels. We define poverty as a state deriving from the lack of adequate skills and associate income inequality with the unequal distribution of education attainments. In this context the goal of our contribution is twofold. First, we show that low asymptotic mobility and persistent income inequality can emerge as a consequence of the fact that the poor require relatively higher returns to increase expenditure on education, so that they devote to education smaller shares of their income that the rich. Second, we critically evaluate our and other related results, in order to shed light on the explanatory power of different sets of assumptions.

Suggested Citation

  • C. Berti Ceroni, 1998. "Poverty Traps and Human Capital Accumulation," Working Papers 315, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  • Handle: RePEc:bol:bodewp:315
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    Cited by:

    1. Lombardo, Vincenzo, 2008. "Poor’s behaviour and inequality traps: the role of human capital," MPRA Paper 14511, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Hanjra, Munir A. & Ferede, Tadele & Gutta, Debel Gemechu, 2009. "Reducing poverty in sub-Saharan Africa through investments in water and other priorities," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 96(7), pages 1062-1070, July.
    3. Theodore Palivos & Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2013. "Intergenerational Complementarities in Education, Endogenous Public Policy, and the Relation Between Growth and Volatility," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 15(2), pages 249-272, April.
    4. Theodore Palivos & Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2010. "Education and growth: A simple model with complicated dynamics," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 6(4), pages 367-384.
    5. Litina, Anastasia & Palivos, Theodore, 2016. "Corruption, tax evasion and social values," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 164-177.
    6. Vincenzo Lombardo, 2012. "Social inclusion and the emergence of development traps," Discussion Papers 13_2012, CRISEI, University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    7. Anastasia Litina & Theodore Palivos, 2015. "Corruption and Tax Evasion: Reflections on Greek Tragedy," Working Papers 193, Bank of Greece.
    8. Rodríguez-Pose, Andrés & Tselios, Vassilis, 2007. "Analysis of Educational Distribution in Europe: Educational Attainment and Inequality Within Regions," Papers DYNREG08, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    9. Athanasios Lapatinas & Anastasia Litina & Eftichios Sophocles Sartzetakis, 2014. "Is Abatement Effective in the Presence of Corruption? A Theoretical Exploration," CREA Discussion Paper Series 14-29, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    10. Rodrigo Arim & Matías Brum & Andrés Dean & Martín Leites & Gonzalo Salas, 2013. "Movilidad de ingreso y trampas de pobreza: nueva evidencia para los países del Cono sur," Estudios Económicos, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, vol. 28(1), pages 3-38.
    11. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Vassilis Tselios, 2007. "Mapping the European regional educational distribution: Educational attainment and inequality," Working Papers 2007-18, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
    12. Anastasia Litina & Theodore Palivos, 2011. "Explicating Corruption and Tax Evasion:Reflections on Greek Tragedy," Discussion Paper Series 2011_07, Department of Economics, University of Macedonia, revised May 2011.
    13. Athanasios Lapatinas & Anastasia Litina & Eftichios S. Sartzetakis, 2011. "Corruption and Environmental Policy: An Alternative Perspective," Working Papers 2011.23, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    14. Rossana Patron, 2014. "On the institutional limits to human capital," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 9,in: Adela García Aracil & Isabel Neira Gómez (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 9, edition 1, volume 9, chapter 45, pages 867-878 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    15. Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2017. "Economic Growth and the Cultural Transmission of Attitudes towards Education," Discussion Papers in Economics 17/06, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    16. Vincenzo Lombardo, 2008. "Poor's behaviour and inequality traps: the role of human capital," Working Papers 10_2008, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
    17. Maria Emma Santos, 2009. "Human Capital and the Quality of Education in a Poverty Trap Model," OPHI Working Papers ophiwp030, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.
    18. Theodore Palivos & Dimitrios Varvarigos, 2009. "Intergenerational Complementarities in Education and the Relationship between Growth and Volatility," Discussion Papers in Economics 09/8, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    19. Luis Casanova, 2008. "Trampas de Pobreza en Argentina: Evidencia Empírica a Partir de un Pseudo Panel," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0064, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    20. Currais, Luis & Rivera, Berta & Rungo, Paolo, 2010. "Effects of the complementarity of child nutrition and education on persistent deprivation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 106(1), pages 67-69, January.
    21. Bertoli Simone, 2006. "Remittances and the Dynamics of Human Capitalin the Recipient Country," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 200607, University of Turin.

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