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Structural equation modeling for those who think they don't care


  • Vince Wiggins

    (StataCorp LP)


We will discuss SEM (structural equation modeling), not from the perspective of the models for which it is most often used--measurement models, confirmatory factor analysis, and the like--but from the perspective of how it can extend other estimators. From a wide range of choices, we will focus on extensions of mixed models (random and fixed-effects regression). Extensions include conditional effects (not completely random), endogenous covariates, and others.

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  • Vince Wiggins, 2011. "Structural equation modeling for those who think they don't care," United Kingdom Stata Users' Group Meetings 2011 13, Stata Users Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:boc:usug11:13

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. William Greene, 2009. "Models for count data with endogenous participation," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 36(1), pages 133-173, February.
    2. Massimiliano Bratti & Alfonso Miranda, 2011. "Endogenous treatment effects for count data models with endogenous participation or sample selection," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(9), pages 1090-1109, September.
    3. Andreas Million & Regina T. Riphahn & Achim Wambach, 2003. "Incentive effects in the demand for health care: a bivariate panel count data estimation," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(4), pages 387-405.
    4. Joseph V. Terza & Donald S. Kenkel & Tsui-Fang Lin & Shinichi Sakata, 2008. "Care-giver advice as a preventive measure for drinking during pregnancy: zeros, categorical outcome responses, and endogeneity," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(1), pages 41-54.
    5. Windmeijer, F A G & Silva, J M C Santos, 1997. "Endogeneity in Count Data Models: An Application to Demand for Health Care," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(3), pages 281-294, May-June.
    6. Donald S. Kenkel & Joseph V. Terza, 2001. "The effect of physician advice on alcohol consumption: count regression with an endogenous treatment effect," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(2), pages 165-184.
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