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Tecnología de Transacciones Endógena y los Costos de la Inflación

Author

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  • Gustavo Suárez

Abstract

Alterar la tecnología de transacciones es un proceso endógeno motivado por el deseo de los agentes privados de reducir los requerimientos de efectivo para llevar a cabo un monto dado de transacciones en la economía. Generar este cambio en la tecnología de transacciones es costoso y un mayor nivel de inflación, al aumentar la disposición a invertir recursos en dicho cambio, le genera a la sociedad una reducción en los recursos disponibles para el consumo y por lo tanto en su bienestar. Este trabajo desarrolla la idea anterior presentando un modelo que incluye en la tecnología de transacciones el número de papeles alternativos al efectivo en la provisión de liquidez. El número de papeles se determina por una condición de libre entrada a la intermediación financiera y es creciente en la inflación. El costo de la inflación se deriva de la necesidad de invertir más recursos para desarrollar los nuevos papeles. Finalmente, de aumentar la inflación, la especificación adoptada permite decir que el beneficio de reducirla es menor que el costo de haberla incrementado inicialmente.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustavo Suárez, 1999. "Tecnología de Transacciones Endógena y los Costos de la Inflación," Borradores de Economia 119, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdr:borrec:119
    DOI: 10.32468/be.119
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Costos de la Inflación; Tecnología de Transacciones.;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives

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