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The transmission of monetary policy shocks in Italy

Author

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  • Eugenio Gaiotti

    () (Bank of Italy, Economic Research Department)

Abstract

The paper studies the transmission of monetary policy shocks in Italy, by means of a structural VAR, using a long data sample; focusing on a long sample period permits a comparison between the Italian evidence and the international literature and makes it possible to test the robustness of the results in relation to structural and institutional changes. The interest rates on the refinancing operations of the Bank of Italy are used as measures of monetary policy; the identification of policy shocks is based on a reaction function that includes the exchange rate among its arguments. Under these identifying assumptions, the responses of output and prices to a monetary shock are consistent with the main findings in the international literature; however, the size of the estimated price response is large, leading to a divergence from existing structural models of the Italian economy, in which the effects of monetary policy on prices are limited. After a restriction, real wages increase (in contrast, in the US they decrease); the exchange rate appreciates; the fall in import prices precedes the decrease in consumer prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Eugenio Gaiotti, 1999. "The transmission of monetary policy shocks in Italy," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 363, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  • Handle: RePEc:bdi:wptemi:td_363_99
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Leeper, Eric M. & Gordon, David B., 1992. "In search of the liquidity effect," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 341-369, June.
    2. Gressani, Daniela & Guiso, Luigi & Visco, Ignazio, 1988. "Disinflation in Italy: An analysis with the econometric model of the bank of Italy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 163-203.
    3. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1999. "Monetary policy shocks: What have we learned and to what end?," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 65-148 Elsevier.
    4. Bagliano, Fabio C. & Favero, Carlo A., 1998. "Measuring monetary policy with VAR models: An evaluation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 1069-1112, June.
    5. Grilli, Vittorio & Roubini, Nouriel, 1992. "Liquidity and exchange rates," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3-4), pages 339-352, May.
    6. Sims, Christopher A., 1992. "Interpreting the macroeconomic time series facts : The effects of monetary policy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 975-1000, June.
    7. Eric M. Leeper & Christopher A. Sims & Tao Zha, 1996. "What Does Monetary Policy Do?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(2), pages 1-78.
    8. Bernanke, Ben S & Blinder, Alan S, 1992. "The Federal Funds Rate and the Channels of Monetary Transmission," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 901-921, September.
    9. Christiano, Lawrence J. & Eichenbaum, Martin & Evans, Charles L., 1997. "Sticky price and limited participation models of money: A comparison," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 1201-1249, June.
    10. Giuseppe De Arcangelis & Giorgio Di Giorgio, 1998. "In Search of Monetary Policy Measures: The Case of Italy in the 1990s," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 57(2), pages 213-250, September.
    11. F. Giavazzi & L. Spaventa, 1989. "Italy: The Real Effects of Inflation and Disinflation," Working Papers 71, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. R. Bonci & F. Columba, 2008. "Monetary policy effects: new evidence from the Italian flow-of-funds," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(21), pages 2803-2818.
    2. Norrbin, Stefan, 2001. "What Have We Learned from Empirical Tests of the Monetary Transmission Effect," Working Paper Series 121, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    3. Massimo Caruso, 2006. "Monetary Policy Impulses, Local Output and the Transmission Mechanism," Giornale degli Economisti, GDE (Giornale degli Economisti e Annali di Economia), Bocconi University, vol. 65(1), pages 1-30, May.
    4. Guido De Blasio, 2004. "Does trade credit substitute for bank credit?," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 498, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    5. Massimo Caruso, 2004. "Monetary Policy Impulses, Local Output and the Transmission Mechanism," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 537, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    6. Paolo Chiades & Leonardo Gambacorta, 2004. "The Bernanke and Blinder Model in an Open Economy: The Italian Case," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 5(1), pages 1-34, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Monetary transmission; monetary policy shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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