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A theory for long-memory in supply and demand

Author

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  • F. Lillo
  • Szabolcs Mike
  • J. Doyne Farmer

Abstract

Recent empirical studies have demonstrated long-memory in the signs of orders to buy or sell in financial markets [2, 19]. We show how this can be caused by delays in market clearing. Under the common practice of order splitting, large orders are broken up into pieces and executed incrementally. If the size of such large orders is power law distributed, this gives rise to power law decaying autocorrelations in the signs of executed orders. More specifically, we show that if the cumulative distribution of large orders of volume v is proportional to v to the power -alpha and the size of executed orders is constant, the autocorrelation of order signs as a function of the lag tau is asymptotically proportional to tau to the power -(alpha - 1). This is a long-memory process when alpha

Suggested Citation

  • F. Lillo & Szabolcs Mike & J. Doyne Farmer, 2004. "A theory for long-memory in supply and demand," Papers cond-mat/0412708, arXiv.org, revised Mar 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:arx:papers:cond-mat/0412708
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    Cited by:

    1. Paolo Barucca & Fabrizio Lillo, 2017. "Behind the price: on the role of agent's reflexivity in financial market microstructure," Papers 1708.07047, arXiv.org.
    2. Chiarella, Carl & Iori, Giulia, 2009. "The impact of heterogeneous trading rules on the limit order book and order flows," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 525-537.
    3. Kevin Primicerio & Damien Challet, 2018. "Large large-trader activity weakens the long memory of limit order markets," Papers 1803.08390, arXiv.org.
    4. Martin D. Gould & Mason A. Porter & Stacy Williams & Mark McDonald & Daniel J. Fenn & Sam D. Howison, 2013. "Limit order books," Quantitative Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(11), pages 1709-1742, November.
    5. Matthieu Wyart & Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Julien Kockelkoren & Marc Potters & Michele Vettorazzo, 2006. "Relation between Bid-Ask Spread, Impact and Volatility in Double Auction Markets," Science & Finance (CFM) working paper archive 500067, Science & Finance, Capital Fund Management.
    6. Yamamoto, Ryuichi, 2011. "Order aggressiveness, pre-trade transparency, and long memory in an order-driven market," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 1938-1963.
    7. Bence Toth & Imon Palit & Fabrizio Lillo & J. Doyne Farmer, 2011. "Why is order flow so persistent?," Papers 1108.1632, arXiv.org, revised Nov 2014.
    8. Emmanuel Bacry & Thibault Jaisson & Jean-Francois Muzy, 2014. "Estimation of slowly decreasing Hawkes kernels: Application to high frequency order book modelling," Papers 1412.7096, arXiv.org.
    9. Julius Bonart & Fabrizio Lillo, 2016. "A continuous and efficient fundamental price on the discrete order book grid," Papers 1608.00756, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2016.
    10. Martin D. Gould & Mason A. Porter & Sam D. Howison, 2015. "Quasi-Centralized Limit Order Books," Papers 1502.00680, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2016.
    11. Damian Eduardo Taranto & Giacomo Bormetti & Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Fabrizio Lillo & Bence Toth, 2016. "Linear models for the impact of order flow on prices II. The Mixture Transition Distribution model," Papers 1604.07556, arXiv.org.
    12. Tóth, Bence & Palit, Imon & Lillo, Fabrizio & Farmer, J. Doyne, 2015. "Why is equity order flow so persistent?," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 218-239.
    13. Jonathan Donier, 2012. "Market Impact with Autocorrelated Order Flow under Perfect Competition," Papers 1212.4770, arXiv.org.
    14. Damian Eduardo Taranto & Giacomo Bormetti & Jean-Philippe Bouchaud & Fabrizio Lillo & Bence Toth, 2016. "Linear models for the impact of order flow on prices I. Propagators: Transient vs. History Dependent Impact," Papers 1602.02735, arXiv.org.
    15. Martin D. Gould & Mason A. Porter & Sam D. Howison, 2015. "The Long Memory of Order Flow in the Foreign Exchange Spot Market," Papers 1504.04354, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2015.
    16. Ryuichi Yamamoto, 2015. "Dynamic predictor selection and order splitting in a limit order market," Working Papers 1514, Waseda University, Faculty of Political Science and Economics.

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