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“Task Trade and its determinants in Spain: a national and regional analysis”


  • José Ramón García

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)

  • Fabio Manca

    () (IPTS- JRC European Commission and Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)

  • Jordi Suriñach

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Barcelona)


Globalisation and technological advances have made possible to offshore specific productive tasks (that do not require physical proximity to the actual location of the work unit) to foreign countries where these are usually performed at lower costs. We analyse the effect of task trade (i.e. task offshorability) on Spanish regional and national employment levels correlating a newly built index of task-delocalisation index to key variables such as the region’s wealth, the worker’s age and level of education, the importance of the service sector and the technological level of the economic activities undertaken in that particular geographical area. We conclude that approximately 25% of Spanish occupations are potentially affected by task trade/offshoring and that this is likely to benefit Spanish economy (and the performance of specific regions, categories of workers and sectors) being Spain a potential recipient of tasks offshored from abroad. Also we obtain that Spain’s trade in tasks correlates strongly with the above variables, presenting significant regional differences.

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  • José Ramón García & Fabio Manca & Jordi Suriñach, 2014. "“Task Trade and its determinants in Spain: a national and regional analysis”," AQR Working Papers 201407, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised Apr 2014.
  • Handle: RePEc:aqr:wpaper:201407

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    task trade; offshore; occupations; national/regional offshoring; tasks. JEL classification: F14; F16; J23; J24; J62;

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