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Women and Common Property Resources in the Management and Health of Livestock in Thai Villages

Author

Listed:
  • Kehren, Tatjana
  • Tisdell, Clem

Abstract

In many Asian countries, women play a significant but varying role in the management of livestock and the use of common resources plays an important role in animal husbandry, and can affect the health of some types of livestock. This paper concentrates on village livestock in Thailand and makes use of survey data as well as national statistics. It first of all outlines the nature and development of livestock industries in Thailand. It then considers the role which women play in the village livestock economy in relation to cattle and buffalo, particularly dairying, and in the keeping of poultry and pigs. The extent to which women are involved in maintaining the health of livestock is considered. Both village bovines and poultry utilise common property resources to a considerable extent in Thailand. This has implications for the economics and productivity of keeping village livestock, the healthiness of such livestock and the spread of livestock diseases.

Suggested Citation

  • Kehren, Tatjana & Tisdell, Clem, 1996. "Women and Common Property Resources in the Management and Health of Livestock in Thai Villages," Animal Health Economics 164575, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uqseah:164575
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/164575
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ramsay, Gavin, 1997. "Assessing the Effect of Vaccination on Disease Incidence and Severity," Animal Health Economics 164585, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    2. Harrison, Steve, 1996. "Cost-Benefit Analysis with Applications to Animal Health Programmes: Animal Health Programmes and Information Systems," Animal Health Economics 164574, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    3. Harrison, Steve, 1996. "Cost Benefit Analysis with Applications to Animal Health Programmes: Basics of CBA," Animal Health Economics 164568, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    4. Ramsay, Gavin, 1996. "Animal Health Information Systems," Animal Health Economics 164576, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    5. Tisdell, Clem, 1995. "Assessing the Approach to Cost-Benefit Analysis of Controlling Livestock Diseases of McInerney and Others," Animal Health Economics 164425, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    6. Murphy, Thomas & Tisdell, Clem, 1996. "An Overview of Trends and Developments in the Thai Dairy Industry," Animal Health Economics 164567, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    7. Harrison, Steve & Tisdell, Clem, 1995. "The Role of Animal Health Programs in Economic Development," Animal Health Economics 164520, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    8. Harrison, Steve, 1996. "Cost-Benefit Analysis with Applications to Animal Health Programmes: Valuation of Non-Market Costs and Benefits," Animal Health Economics 164573, University of Queensland, School of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    livestock disease; role of women in farming; common property resources; Thailand.; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Health Economics and Policy; Livestock Production/Industries; Public Economics; Q16; Q12;

    JEL classification:

    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets

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