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Measuring the Economic Impact of Tourism and Special Events: Lessons from Mississippi

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  • Myles, Albert E.
  • Carter, Rachael

Abstract

With the use of this dynamic spreadsheet model, tourism managers can gain valuable insight into tourism and special events. This insight can help them plan future events or evaluate whether the costs of producing these events are justified by the benefits. Visitor spending from outside the county creates direct sales in the local economy. Each dollar of direct sales adds indirect and induced spending in the county. Besides these impacts, visitor spending produces labor income and jobs for residents in the county.

Suggested Citation

  • Myles, Albert E. & Carter, Rachael, 2009. "Measuring the Economic Impact of Tourism and Special Events: Lessons from Mississippi," 2009 Annual Meeting, January 31-February 3, 2009, Atlanta, Georgia 46857, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saeana:46857
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/46857
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    References listed on IDEAS

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