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Hunter And Angler Expenditures, Characteristics, And Economic Effects, North Dakota, 2001-2002 - Summary

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  • Leistritz, F. Larry
  • Bangsund, Dean A.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to estimate the economic effects of hunting and fishing activities during the 2001-2002 season on the North Dakota economy, and to compare current information to previous studies to identify trends in hunting and angling activities. A mail survey of 29,034 resident hunters and anglers and 7,199 nonresident hunters and anglers was conducted to solicit information on 21 hunting and fishing activities during the 2001-2002 season. Total spending by hunters and anglers in North Dakota during the 2001-2002 season was estimated at $468.5 million, excluding purchases of licenses. Resident hunter and angler expenditures were estimated at $402.7 million, and nonresident hunter and angler expenditures were estimated at $65.9 million. Hunting expenditures were estimated at $166.4 million, and fishing expenditures were estimated at $302.1 million. Total spending in rural areas was estimated at $213.4 million by residents and $48.4 million by nonresidents. Total direct expenditures ($468.5 million) from hunting and fishing in North Dakota generated nearly $544.9 million in secondary economic effects. Gross business volume (direct and secondary effects) of hunting and fishing in North Dakota was estimated at $1 billion. Hunting and fishing activities were estimated to generate $30.5 million in general state tax collections and support 13,100 full-time equivalent jobs throughout the state. As a result of increased average per person spending in most hunting and fishing activities and increased number of participants in most activities, total spending in North Dakota increased by $106 million or 29 percent from 1996-97 to 2001-02. Total spending by resident hunters and anglers increased by $73 million or 22 percent, while nonresident spending increased by $33 million or 101 percent over the period. Hunter expenditures increased by $31 million or 23 percent, while angler expenditures increased by $75 million or 33 percent over the period. Gross business volume from all hunting and fishing activities increased by $233.9 million (30 percent) over the period. The economic importance of hunting and fishing in North Dakota has continued to increase throughout the 1990s, and continues to be an important source of economic activity in the state. However, policy decisions affecting wildlife management should not be based solely on economic information, and must balance the ever increasing demand for wildlife-related recreation with the supply of wildlife-related resources to ensure the continued economic benefits that abundant hunting and fishing opportunities provide to the state.

Suggested Citation

  • Leistritz, F. Larry & Bangsund, Dean A., 2003. "Hunter And Angler Expenditures, Characteristics, And Economic Effects, North Dakota, 2001-2002 - Summary," Agribusiness & Applied Economics Report 23511, North Dakota State University, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:nddaae:23511
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.23511
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/23511/files/aer507su.pdf
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    Cited by:

    1. Bangsund, Dean A. & Hodur, Nancy M., 2013. "Economic Contribution of Public park and Recreation Activities in North Dakota: A Summary of Economic Effects," Agribusiness & Applied Economics Report 162926, North Dakota State University, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics.

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    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

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