IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

2003 Michigan Cash Grain Farm Business Analysis Summary


  • Wittenberg, Eric
  • Harsh, Stephen B.


This report summarizes the 2003 financial and production records of 92 Michigan cash grain farms. To be included, the farms must have produced at least 50 percent of gross cash farm income from one or a combination of these items; corn, soybeans, wheat, all varieties of navy beans, oats, sugar beets and other small grains. The records came from Michigan State University's TelFarm/MicroTel project, the Farm Credit Service system, or by AgriSolutions in Michigan. The values were pooled into averages for reporting purposes. Farm records were included if a farm financial analysis was completed on 2003 data including beginning and ending balance sheets, plus income and expenses. The data were checked to verify that cash discrepancy was less than 10% of gross cash inflow and that debt discrepancy was less than $1,000. While considerable variation in the data exists, average values are reported in the summary tables.

Suggested Citation

  • Wittenberg, Eric & Harsh, Stephen B., 2004. "2003 Michigan Cash Grain Farm Business Analysis Summary," Staff Papers 11569, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11569

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Reardon, Thomas & Timmer, C. Peter, 2007. "Transformation of Markets for Agricultural Output in Developing Countries Since 1950: How Has Thinking Changed?," Handbook of Agricultural Economics, Elsevier.
    2. Rozelle, Scott & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2000. "Transition And Agriculture," Working Papers 11948, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    3. Thomas Reardon & Johan F. M. Swinnen, 2004. "Agrifood Sector Liberalisation and the Rise of Supermarkets in Former State-controlled Economies: A Comparative Overview," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 22, pages 515-523, September.
    4. Wilkinson, John, 2004. "The Food Processing Industry, Globalization and Developing Countries," eJADE: electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization, Agricultural and Development Economics Division, vol. 1(2).
    5. Key, Nigel & Runsten, David, 1999. "Contract Farming, Smallholders, and Rural Development in Latin America: The Organization of Agroprocessing Firms and the Scale of Outgrower Production," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 381-401, February.
    6. Krugman, Paul, 1991. "Increasing Returns and Economic Geography," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(3), pages 483-499, June.
    7. Gero Carletto & Katia Covarrubias & Benjamin Davis & Marika Krausova & Kostas Stamoulis & Paul Winters & Alberto Zezza, 2007. "Rural income generating activities in developing countries: re-assessing the evidence," The Electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, vol. 4(1), pages 146-193.
    8. Neven, David & Reardon, Thomas & Chege, Jonathan & Wang, Honglin, 2005. "Supermarkets And Consumers In Africa: The Case Of Nairobi, Kenya," Staff Papers 11584, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Marcel Fafchamps & Forhad Shilpi, 2003. "The spatial division of labour in Nepal," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 23-66.
    10. Dries, Liesbeth & Swinnen, Johan F. M., 2004. "Foreign Direct Investment, Vertical Integration, and Local Suppliers: Evidence from the Polish Dairy Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1525-1544, September.
    11. Thomas Reardon & C. Peter Timmer & Christopher B. Barrett & Julio Berdegué, 2003. "The Rise of Supermarkets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1140-1146.
    12. Reardon, Thomas & Flores, Luis, 2006. "Viewpoint: "Customized competitiveness" strategies for horticultural exporters - Central America focus with lessons from and for other regions," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 483-503, December.
    13. Anonymous & Gehlhar, Mark J., 2005. "New Directions In Global Food Markets," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33751, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    14. Hymer, Stephen H & Resnick, Stephen, 1969. "A Model of an Agrarian Economy with Nonagricultural Activities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(4), pages 493-506, Part I Se.
    15. Pingali, Prabhu L. & Rosegrant, Mark W., 1995. "Agricultural commercialization and diversification: processes and policies," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 171-185, June.
    16. Dinghuan Hu & Thomas Reardon & Scott Rozelle & Peter Timmer & Honglin Wang, 2004. "The Emergence of Supermarkets with Chinese Characteristics: Challenges and Opportunities for China's Agricultural Development," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 22, pages 557-586, September.
    17. Escobal, Javier, 2005. "The Role of Public Infraestructure in Market Development in Rural Peru," MPRA Paper 727, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Burger, Kees & Kameo, Daniel & Sandee, Henry, 1999. "Clustering Of Small Agro-Processing Firms In Indonesia," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 2(03/04).
    19. Hamish R. Gow & Johan F. M. Swinnen, 2001. "Private Enforcement Capital and Contract Enforcement in Transition Economies," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 686-690.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Crop Production/Industries;


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11569. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.