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Empezando a conocer el mercado doméstico: Análisis de la oferta de productos de carne bovina

Author

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  • Lanfranco, Bruno A.
  • Reyes, Maria L.
  • Risso, Juan M.

Abstract

El presente estudio procura conocer mejor la demanda de productos de carne bovina para tres áreas geográficas de Montevideo que representan diferentes niveles socioeconómicos de la población, a través de la oferta observada en los dos principales formatos de comercialización: supermercados y carnicerías. En la zona de mayor nivel socioeconómico (AG1) se comercializa el 21% del volumen total de estos productos mientras que en la de nivel medio (AG2), con mayor concentración poblacional, se comercializa el 47%; el restante 32% se vende en la zona de menor nivel (AG3). Los resultados obtenidos mostraron que a medida que disminuía el nivel socioeconómico de los consumidores aumentaba la demanda por cortes más económicos (aguja, paleta, falda y asado) en comparación con los más valiosos (lomo, nalga y peceto). Independientemente, se observó que las carnicerías ofertaban sus productos casi exclusivamente en vitrinas (mayoritariamente cortes sueltos frente cortes al vacío o bandejas). Si bien los supermercados han interpretado mejor (o inducido) los cambios en los hábitos de los consumidores las carnicerías han comenzado a adoptar estrategias para aumentar la captación de clientes, que van desde mejoras en la presentación y exposición de los productos hasta la incorporación de productos anexos a su oferta comercial.

Suggested Citation

  • Lanfranco, Bruno A. & Reyes, Maria L. & Risso, Juan M., 2004. "Empezando a conocer el mercado doméstico: Análisis de la oferta de productos de carne bovina," Serie Tecnica 121754, Instituto Nacional de Investigacion Agropecuaria (INIA).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iniast:121754
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    meat products; marketing strategies; domestic consumers; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; D1; D4; L81;

    JEL classification:

    • D1 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior
    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • L81 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Retail and Wholesale Trade; e-Commerce

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