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The Impacts of Exogenous Oil Supply Shocks on Mediterranean Economies

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  • Bastianin, Andrea
  • Galeotti, Marzio
  • Manera, Matteo

Abstract

The security of energy supply is a key geopolitical factor in the relationship between the European Union and the southern neighborhood countries of the Middle East and North Africa region. We study the response of eight Mediterranean economies to exogenous oil supply shocks. We focus on the effects on economic activity - as measured by real Gross Value Added - for the whole economy, as well as for selected industries. We show that there are clear patterns characterizing the response of different economies to an unexpected reduction in global oil production. The main determinants of these patterns are the degree of energy intensity and energy dependence of the country, as well as the composition of its Gross Value Added.

Suggested Citation

  • Bastianin, Andrea & Galeotti, Marzio & Manera, Matteo, 2016. "The Impacts of Exogenous Oil Supply Shocks on Mediterranean Economies," Energy: Resources and Markets 230683, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:feemer:230683
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.230683
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bastianin, Andrea & Manera, Matteo, 2018. "How Does Stock Market Volatility React To Oil Price Shocks?," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(3), pages 666-682, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Resource /Energy Economics and Policy;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices
    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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