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Environmental and socioeconomic impact of the new cotton reform


  • Arriaza Balmón, Manuel


Following the decoupling of the cotton subsidies in 2006 the production system has become less intensive in input usage with an average yield reduction of 40 per cent. Albeit the farm income has not been reduced, the reform has had a negative effect on the economy of some rural areas of Southern Spain, where there are few productive alternatives to cotton, with a 39% reduction of direct farm labour. Besides, the reform has been borne by the ginning industry (60% reduction), the agrochemical suppliers and the auxiliary sector. On the other hand, the environment has benefits from the extensification of the cotton production since three quarter of the production is now carried out under integrated production that implies a reduction in the amount of fertilizers and pesticides that farmers can use.

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  • Arriaza Balmón, Manuel, 2008. "Environmental and socioeconomic impact of the new cotton reform," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 44328, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:44328

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 17(3), pages 93-118, Summer.
    2. Jayachandran N. Variyam & John Cawley, 2006. "Nutrition Labels and Obesity," NBER Working Papers 11956, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Miljkovic, Dragan & Nganje, William & de Chastenet, Helene, 2008. "Economic factors affecting the increase in obesity in the United States: Differential response to price," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 48-60, February.
    4. Maria L. Loureiro & Rodolfo M. Nayga, 2005. "International Dimensions of Obesity and Overweight Related Problems: An Economics Perspective," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 87(5), pages 1147-1153.
    5. Runge, C. Ford, 2007. "The Economic Consequences of the Obese," Working Papers 7261, University of Minnesota, Center for International Food and Agricultural Policy.
    6. Kuchler, Fred & Golan, Elise H., 2004. "Is There a Role for Government in Reducing the Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity?," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 19(3).
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    cotton; CAP reform; decoupling; Spain; Agricultural and Food Policy; Environmental Economics and Policy;

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