IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The environmental feature in consumer purchasing preferences: The case of Genetically Modified foods


  • Rodriguez-Entrena, Macario
  • Sayadi, Samir


Progress in Biotechnology (Gene Revolution) tends to be compared with that of the Green Revolution in the sixties and seventies. This process is developing in a context of increasing concern by the consumers for food safety and environmental conservation, stirring controversy in the scientific community and society about the potential benefits and possible risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). In this context, the purpose of the present study is to estimate consumer preferences in relation to genetically modified (GM) foods, emphasizing the relative importance of environmental attribute, to develop an understanding of the factors influencing consumer purchasing decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Rodriguez-Entrena, Macario & Sayadi, Samir, 2008. "The environmental feature in consumer purchasing preferences: The case of Genetically Modified foods," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43973, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:43973

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. J. Brian Hardaker & James W. Richardson & Gudbrand Lien & Keith D. Schumann, 2004. "Stochastic efficiency analysis with risk aversion bounds: a simplified approach," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 48(2), pages 253-270, June.
    2. Lien, G. & Stordal, S. & Hardaker, J.B. & Asheim, L.J., 2007. "Risk aversion and optimal forest replanting: A stochastic efficiency study," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 181(3), pages 1584-1592, September.
    3. Lars Brink & Bruce McCarl, 1978. "The Tradeoff between Expected Return and Risk Among Cornbelt Farmers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 60(2), pages 259-263.
    4. Lien, Gudbrand & Brian Hardaker, J. & Flaten, Ola, 2007. "Risk and economic sustainability of crop farming systems," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 541-552, May.
    5. Schurle, Bryan W. & Tierney, William I., Jr., 1990. "A Comparison of Risk Preference Measurements with Implications for Extension Programming," Staff Papers 118185, Kansas State University, Department of Agricultural Economics.
    6. Clancy, Daragh & Breen, James P. & Butler, Anne Marie & Thorne, Fiona S., 2008. "The economic viability of biomass crops versus conventional agricultural systems and its potential impact on farm incomes in Ireland," 107th Seminar, January 30-February 1, 2008, Sevilla, Spain 6485, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:43973. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.