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Changes in Families’ Organic Food Consumption

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  • Riefer, A.
  • Hamm, Ulrich

Abstract

According to recent research based on the theoretical concept of the family cycle it can be assumed that expenditures for organic food in families decline as children get older. For organic food marketing this raises the question to which extent organic food consumption in families is characterised by changes, when changes in families’ organic food consumption appear over time and what the reasons for these changes are. The article presents theoretical background, research design and results of a qualitative study. Based on qualitative interviews which were analysed according to Grounded Theory it is found that consumers perceive changes in organic food consumption in terms of increase and decrease. As causal conditions for this, pregnancy, the feeding of babies with complementary food, children’s adolescence, a new partner and a new situation in household income could be identified. The results point out how qualitative research can contribute to the completion of existing and the inspiration for future quantitative studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Riefer, A. & Hamm, Ulrich, 2008. "Changes in Families’ Organic Food Consumption," 2008 International Congress, August 26-29, 2008, Ghent, Belgium 43653, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaae08:43653
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    Keywords

    Family Cycle; Organic Food; Qualitative Interviews; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety;

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