IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Multi-Factor Optimization and Factor Interactions during Product Innovation


  • Hron, Jan
  • Macak, Tomas


In this paper, we develop core of an expert system for planning of innovation. The practical outcome of the paper is based on rules determination for search of perspective innovation and its distinguish from commercially unperceptive innovation. The second practical outcome of the paper is a research of interactions between factors during optimization of the product. In general, we gain process synergy, which can be a source of competitive advantage during product innovation in the presence of organizational complexity by systematically moving through the process definition, control, and improvement elements. The improvement elements can cause interactions between these elements (or factors/process parameters). First, we have to distinguish between synergistic and antagonistic interactions. For synergistic interaction can be used graphic illustration - lines on the plot do not cross each other. In contrast, for antagonistic interaction, the lines on the plot cross each other. In this case, the change in mean response for factor at low level is noticeable high compared to high level. Searching for positive interactions leading to the creation of synergies in the performances we can do at each stage of management innovations. At first, we realize only part of the possible gain, with unrealized potential remaining. Using process control, over time, we stabilize our process and obtain additional limited gain. Using process improvement, we can realize additional gain (it looks as short vertical line during the time), with some potential gain remaining. When new, feasible options develop, we can redefined our process and continue with our control and improvement efforts. Hence, each process-related issue definition, control, improvement has a distinct role to play. Confusion between roles or the omission of any of the roles creates disharmony and frustration in the production system, which ultimately limits production system effectiveness and efficiency. Sometimes, in the presence of confusion, it is possible that effectiveness and efficiency may decrease. In this situation, we hope to learn from our negative factor interactions (or failures) and subsequently improvement trends in long term with using sophisticated methods and own intuition. This paper objective is to create rules for planning innovation expert system. According to this rules will be possible to distinguish perspective innovation from commercially unperceptive innovation. The second paper objective is to explore interactions between factors during a product optimization. For this purpose will be used the methodology based on minimization of logic functions and design of experiments (analytical tools of DOE).

Suggested Citation

  • Hron, Jan & Macak, Tomas, 2012. "Multi-Factor Optimization and Factor Interactions during Product Innovation," 131st Seminar, September 18-19, 2012, Prague, Czech Republic 135787, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:eaa131:135787

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bob Crabtree & Neil Chalmers & Nicola-Jo Barron, 1998. "Information for Policy Design: Modelling Participation in a Farm Woodland Incentive Scheme," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 306-320.
    2. Rob Fraser, 2012. "Moral Hazard, Targeting and Contract Duration in Agriā€Environmental Policy," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(1), pages 56-64, February.
    3. Edi Defrancesco & Paola Gatto & Ford Runge & Samuele Trestini, 2008. "Factors Affecting Farmers' Participation in Agri-environmental Measures: A Northern Italian Perspective," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 59(1), pages 114-131, February.
    4. Gerard Wynn & Bob Crabtree & Jacqueline Potts, 2001. "Modelling Farmer Entry into the Environmentally Sensitive Area Schemes in Scotland," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 52(1), pages 65-82.
    5. Oriana Bandiera & Imran Rasul, 2006. "Social Networks and Technology Adoption in Northern Mozambique," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(514), pages 869-902, October.
    6. Geoff A Wilson & Kaley Hart, 2000. "Financial imperative or conservation concern? EU farmers' motivations for participation in voluntary agri-environmental schemes," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 32(12), pages 2161-2185, December.
    7. Gloy, Brent A. & Akridge, Jay T. & Whipker, Linda D., 2000. "Sources Of Information For Commercial Farms: Usefulness Of Media And Personal Sources," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 3(02).
    8. Gerald F. Ortmann & George F. Patrick & Wesley N. Musser & D. Howard Doster, 1993. "Use of private consultants and other sources of information by large cornbelt farmers," Agribusiness, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 391-402.
    9. Timothy Conley & Udry Christopher, 2001. "Social Learning Through Networks: The Adoption of New Agricultural Technologies in Ghana," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 668-673.
    10. Ira Matuschke & Matin Qaim, 2009. "The impact of social networks on hybrid seed adoption in India," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 493-505, September.
    11. Volker Beckmann & Jorg Eggers & Evy Mettepenningen, 2009. "Deciding how to decide on agri-environmental schemes: the political economy of subsidiarity, decentralisation and participation in the European Union," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(5), pages 689-716.
    12. Chatzimichael, Konstantinos & Genius, Margarita & Tzouvelekas, Vangelis, 2014. "Informational cascades and technology adoption: Evidence from Greek and German organic growers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 186-195.
    13. F. Bonnieux & P. Rainelli & D. Vermersch, 1998. "Estimating the Supply of Environmental Benefits by Agriculture: A French Case Study," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 11(2), pages 135-153, March.
    14. Virgile Chassagnon & Marilyne Audran, 2011. "The Impact Of Interpersonal Networks On The Innovativeness Of Inventors: From Theory To Empirical Evidence," International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 15(05), pages 931-958.
    15. Dietmar Harhoff & Francis Narin & F. M. Scherer & Katrin Vopel, 1999. "Citation Frequency And The Value Of Patented Inventions," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(3), pages 511-515, August.
    16. Pierre Dupraz & Karine Latouche & Nadine Turpin, 2009. "Threshold effect and co-ordination of agri-environmental efforts," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 52(5), pages 613-630.
    17. Isabel Vanslembrouck & Guido Huylenbroeck & Wim Verbeke, 2002. "Determinants of the Willingness of Belgian Farmers to Participate in Agri-environmental Measures," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 489-511.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item


    Innovation; expert system; multi-criteria optimization; effectiveness; efficiency; synergy; process improvement; logic function; redundancy factor; design of experiments; Agribusiness; Agricultural and Food Policy;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:eaa131:135787. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.