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Impact of Adoption of Improved Groundnut Varieties on Factor Demand and Productivity in Uganda

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  • Diiro, Gracious M.
  • Sam, Abdoul G.
  • Kraybill, David S.

Abstract

The study analyzed the impact of adoption of improved groundnut varieties on farm inputs demand and productivity using instrumental variables approach. The data was collected from a simple random sample of 161 groundnut farmers in Eastern Uganda. Econometric results show significant increase in expenditure on improved seed and labor among adopters relative to the non-adopters. Adoption of improved varieties significantly increased groundnuts yield, by about 1688kg per hectare. Thus, more effort is needed to increase farmers’ access to improved varieties. The Government and partners should facilitate the development of local seed multiplication systems to reduce the cost of improved seed..

Suggested Citation

  • Diiro, Gracious M. & Sam, Abdoul G. & Kraybill, David S., 2011. "Impact of Adoption of Improved Groundnut Varieties on Factor Demand and Productivity in Uganda," 2011 Annual Meeting, July 24-26, 2011, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 103848, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea11:103848
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    6. Nicolai V. Kuminoff & Ada Wossink, 2010. "Why Isn't More US Farmland Organic?," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(2), pages 240-258.
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    Keywords

    Production Economics; Productivity Analysis; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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