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A Collective Performance-Based Contract For Point-Nonpoint Source Pollution Trading

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  • Taylor, Michael A.
  • Randall, Alan
  • Sohngen, Brent

Abstract

Collective performance-based trading can be achieved by pairing a team contract with an auction to determine team membership. The auction effectively overcomes adverse selection, and the team contract reduces the incentive to "free-ride" associated with moral hazard in teams.

Suggested Citation

  • Taylor, Michael A. & Randall, Alan & Sohngen, Brent, 2003. "A Collective Performance-Based Contract For Point-Nonpoint Source Pollution Trading," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22069, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea03:22069
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/22069
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Daberkow, Stan G. & McBride, William D., 2001. "Decomposing The Size Effect On The Adoption Of Innovations: Agrobiotechnology And Precision Farming," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20527, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    5. Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1983. "Stochastic Structure, Farm Size and Technology Adoption in Developing Agriculture," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 35(2), pages 307-328, July.
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    7. Christine A. Ervin & David E. Ervin, 1982. "Factors Affecting the Use of Soil Conservation Practices: Hypotheses, Evidence, and Policy Implications," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 58(3), pages 277-292.
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    9. Schultz, Theodore W, 1975. "The Value of the Ability to Deal with Disequilibria," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 827-846, September.
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    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy;

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