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Working Paper 135 - International Remittances and Income Inequality in Africa

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Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of migrant remittances on income inequality in African countries, using a panel of five eight-year non-overlapping windows for the period 1960-2006. The results suggest that, first, international migrant remittances have a significant positive impact on income inequality in African countries. After instrumenting for the possible endogeneity of remittances, a 10 percent increase in remittances as a percentage of GDP will lead, on average, to a 0.013 percent increase in income inequality in Africa. Second, initial per capita GDP strongly increases income inequality. Third, inflation rate appears to be the strongest factor fueling income inequality in the Continent. Fourth, education significantly reduces income inequality. Fifth, the North African dummy and remittances inflows to North Africa largely reduce income inequality in the sub-region while doing the opposite in Sub-Saharan Africa. The policy implications of these results are discussed.

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  • John Anyanwu, 2011. "Working Paper 135 - International Remittances and Income Inequality in Africa," Working Paper Series 325, African Development Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:adb:adbwps:325
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    Cited by:

    1. Meniago, Christelle & Asongu, Simplice A., 2018. "Revisiting the finance-inequality nexus in a panel of African countries," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 399-419.
    2. Asongu, Simplice, 2014. "A brief clarification to the questionable economics of foreign aid for inclusive human development," MPRA Paper 64458, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:oup:jafrec:v:27:y:2018:i:1:p:108-126. is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:oup:jafrec:v:27:y:2018:i:1:p:127-148. is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:bla:socsci:v:98:y:2017:i:1:p:282-298 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "How Enhancing Gender Inclusion Affects Inequality: Thresholds of Complementary Policies for Sustainable Development," Working Papers 19/034, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    7. Asongu, Simplice, 2013. "Mobile banking and mobile phone penetration: which is more pro-poor in Africa?," MPRA Paper 56800, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Asongu, Simplice A & Odhiambo, Nicholas M, 2019. "Foreign direct investment,information technology and economic growth dynamics in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 25593, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    9. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2017. "Foreign Aid and Inclusive Development: Updated Evidence from Africa, 2005–2012," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 98(1), pages 282-298, March.
    10. Simplice A. Asongu & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2019. "Inequality and the Economic Participation of Women in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Empirical Investigation," Working Papers 19/027, European Xtramile Centre of African Studies (EXCAS).
    11. repec:eee:ecanpo:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:169-178 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "Mobile Phone Penetration, Mobile Banking and Inclusive Development in Africa," The African Finance Journal, Africagrowth Institute, vol. 18(1), pages 34-52.
    13. Rosemary E. Isoto & David S. Kraybill, 2017. "Remittances and household nutrition: evidence from rural Kilimanjaro in Tanzania," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 9(2), pages 239-253, April.

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