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Market Structure and the Environmental Implications of Trade Liberalization: Russia’s Accession to the World Trade Organization

In: Trade Policies for Development and Transition

Author

Listed:
  • Christoph Böhringer
  • Thomas F. Rutherford
  • David G. Tarr
  • Natalia Turdyeva

Abstract

We investigate the environmental impacts of Russia’s World Trade Organization (WTO) accession with a computable general equilibrium model incorporating imperfectly competitive firms, foreign direct investment and endogenous productivity. WTO accession increases CO2 emissions through technique (−), composition (+) and scale (+) effects. We consider three complementary policies to limit CO2 emissions: cap and trade, emission intensity standards and energy efficiency standards. With imperfectly competitive firms, gains from WTO accession result with any of these policies. If we assume perfectly competitive market structures, the negative environmental impacts of WTO accession are smaller and no net gains arise when environmental regulation involves energy intensity or efficiency standards.

Suggested Citation

  • Christoph Böhringer & Thomas F. Rutherford & David G. Tarr & Natalia Turdyeva, 2017. "Market Structure and the Environmental Implications of Trade Liberalization: Russia’s Accession to the World Trade Organization," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: Trade Policies for Development and Transition, chapter 20, pages 459-485, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
  • Handle: RePEc:wsi:wschap:9789813108448_0020
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arnold, Jens M. & Javorcik, Beata S. & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2011. "Does services liberalization benefit manufacturing firms?: Evidence from the Czech Republic," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1), pages 136-146, September.
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    3. Jesper Jensen & Thomas Rutherford & David Tarr, 2014. "The Impact of Liberalizing Barriers to Foreign Direct Investment in Services: The Case of Russian Accession to the World Trade Organization," World Scientific Book Chapters, in: APPLIED TRADE POLICY MODELING IN 16 COUNTRIES Insights and Impacts from World Bank CGE Based Projects, chapter 6, pages 125-149, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International Trade Policy; Developing Countries; Transition Countries; Growth; Poverty; Environment; Multilateral; Adjustment Costs; Autos and Steel;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations

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