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Family Formation, Gender and Labour During the First Globalization in Montevideo, Uruguay

In: Cliometrics of the Family

Author

Listed:
  • María M. Camou

    (Universidad de la República)

Abstract

The aim in this research is to analyse the impact of institutions such as the family for a better comprehension of the status of women in the formation of Uruguayan society. Uruguay was a country with a large contingent of European immigrants who came mainly from Spain, followed by Italy. Although these two countries are not representative of the Western European marriage pattern, it will be argued that the immigration process caused a disruption of the original family patterns and led to more unstructured family formation and to weaker family ties and greater predominance of the nuclear family. Weaker family ties characterized by more egalitarian gender and intergenerational relations are supposed to allow for women to take on a less traditional role and stimulate higher female labour force participation. Our results show that the effects of migration can not only be derived from the specific demographic, cultural and human capital profile of the immigrants but also indirectly from the consequences of their decision to immigrate in their life courses and labour options.

Suggested Citation

  • María M. Camou, 2019. "Family Formation, Gender and Labour During the First Globalization in Montevideo, Uruguay," Studies in Economic History, in: Claude Diebolt & Auke Rijpma & Sarah Carmichael & Selin Dilli & Charlotte Störmer (ed.), Cliometrics of the Family, chapter 0, pages 261-276, Springer.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:stechp:978-3-319-99480-2_11
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-99480-2_11
    as

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