IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/pup/chapts/8541-1.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Introduction to The Other Invisible Hand: Delivering Public Services through Choice and Competition

In: The Other Invisible Hand: Delivering Public Services through Choice and Competition

Author

Listed:
  • Julian Le Grand

    (London School of Economics and Political Science)

Abstract

How can we ensure high-quality public services such as health care and education? Governments spend huge amounts of public money on public services such as health, education, and social care, and yet the services that are actually delivered are often low quality, inefficiently run, unresponsive to their users, and inequitable in their distribution. In this book, Julian Le Grand argues that the best solution is to offer choice to users and to encourage competition among providers. Le Grand has just completed a period as policy advisor working within the British government at the highest levels, and from this he has gained evidence to support his earlier theoretical work and has experienced the political reality of putting public policy theory into practice. He examines four ways of delivering public services: trust; targets and performance management; "voice"; and choice and competition. He argues that, although all of these have their merits, in most situations policies that rely on extending choice and competition among providers have the most potential for delivering high-quality, efficient, responsive, and equitable services. But it is important that the relevant policies be appropriately designed, and this book provides a detailed discussion of the principal features that these policies should have in the context of health care and education. It concludes with a discussion of the politics of choice.

Suggested Citation

  • Julian Le Grand, 2007. "Introduction to The Other Invisible Hand: Delivering Public Services through Choice and Competition," Introductory Chapters,in: The Other Invisible Hand: Delivering Public Services through Choice and Competition Princeton University Press.
  • Handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:8541-1
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://press.princeton.edu/chapters/i8541.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:eco:journ3:2017-02-19 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cooper, Zack & Gibbons, Stephen & Skellern, Matthew, 2016. "Does competition from private surgical centres improve public hospitals’ performance? Evidence from the English National Health Service," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67662, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Brad R. Taylor, 2016. "Exit and the Epistemic Quality of Voice," Economic Affairs, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(2), pages 133-144, June.
    4. Iversen, Evald Bundgaard & Cuskelly, Graham, 2015. "Effects of different policy approaches on sport facility utilisation strategies," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 529-541.
    5. Bjarke Refslund & Annette Thörnquist, 2016. "Intra-European labour migration and low-wage competition—comparing the Danish and Swedish experiences across three sectors," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 62-78, January.
    6. Alessandro Petretto, 2013. "On the Fuzzy Boundaries between Public and Private in Health-Care Organization and Funding Systems," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, issue 1, pages 327-370, January-M.
    7. Wise, Ramsey, 2015. "Does market-oriented education systems improve performance or increase inequality: A configurational comparative method for understanding (un)intended educational outcomes," TranState Working Papers 189, University of Bremen, Collaborative Research Center 597: Transformations of the State.
    8. Hemerijck, Anton, 2011. "21st Century Welfare Provision is more than the "social insurance state": A reply to Paul Pierson," Working papers of the ZeS 03/2011, University of Bremen, Centre for Social Policy Research (ZeS).
    9. Bevan, Gwyn & Evans, Alice, 2018. "Reputations count: why benchmarking performance is improving health care across the world," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 86469, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    10. repec:eee:ecanpo:v:55:y:2017:i:c:p:47-56 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Enrico Colombatto, 2011. "Is there a health-care problem in Western societies?," ICER Working Papers 14-2011, ICER - International Centre for Economic Research.
    12. Kaire Põder & Triin Lauri, 2014. "Will Choice Hurt? Compared to What? School Choice Experiment in Estonia," TUT Economic Research Series 11, Department of Finance and Economics, Tallinn University of Technology.
    13. repec:taf:pubmmg:v:36:y:2016:i:6:p:409-416 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Joan Costa-Font & Valentina Zigante, 2016. "The choice agenda in European health systems: the role of middle-class demands," Public Money & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 409-416, September.
    15. Svetlana Suslova, 2014. "The Quasi-Markets Of Social Services: The Competitiveness Of Russian Nonprofit Organizations Against For-Profit Organizations And Public Providers," HSE Working papers WP BRP 16/PA/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    16. Yuda, Michio, 2016. "Inefficiencies in the Japanese National Health Insurance system: A stochastic frontier approach," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 65-77.
    17. Nick Manning & Joanna Watkins, 2013. "Targeting Results, Diagnosing the Means," World Bank Other Operational Studies 25488, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    public services; health care; education; choice; competition; trust; performance management; voice;

    JEL classification:

    • H44 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Goods: Mixed Markets

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:8541-1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Webmaster). General contact details of provider: http://press.princeton.edu .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.