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Macroeconomics: A Survey of Laboratory Research

In: The Handbook of Experimental Economics, Volume 2

Author

Listed:
  • John H. Kagel

    (Ohio State University)

  • Alvin E. Roth

    (Stanford University
    Harvard University)

Abstract

When The Handbook of Experimental Economics first came out in 1995, the notion of economists conducting lab experiments to generate data was relatively new. Since then, the field has exploded. This second volume of the Handbook covers some of the most exciting new growth areas in experimental economics, presents the latest results and experimental methods, and identifies promising new directions for future research. Featuring contributions by leading practitioners, the Handbook describes experiments in macroeconomics, charitable giving, neuroeconomics, other-regarding preferences, market design, political economy, subject population effects, gender effects, auctions, and learning and the economics of small decisions. Contributors focus on key developments and report on experiments, highlighting the dialogue between experimenters and theorists. While most of the experiments consist of laboratory studies, the book also includes several chapters that report extensively on field experiments related to the subject area studied.

Suggested Citation

  • John H. Kagel & Alvin E. Roth, 2016. "Macroeconomics: A Survey of Laboratory Research," Introductory Chapters, in: The Handbook of Experimental Economics, Volume 2, Princeton University Press.
  • Handle: RePEc:pup:chapts:10874-1
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Asad Zaman, 2015. "Monetary Paradoxes of Baby-Sitting Cooperatives," PIDE-Working Papers 2015:132, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    2. Fehr, Dietmar & Heinemann, Frank & Llorente-Saguer, Aniol, 2019. "The power of sunspots: An experimental analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 123-136.
    3. Gabriele Camera & Marco Casari, 2014. "The Coordination Value of Monetary Exchange: Experimental Evidence," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 6(1), pages 290-314, February.
    4. Jacopo Magnani & Aspen Gorry & Ryan Oprea, 2016. "Time and State Dependence in an Ss Decision Experiment," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 285-310, January.
    5. Rud, Olga A. & Rabanal, Jean Paul & Sharifova, Manizha, 2019. "An experiment on the efficiency of bilateral exchange under incomplete markets," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 253-267.
    6. Camille Cornand & Frank Heinemann, 2018. "Experiments on macroeconomics: methods and applications," Working Papers halshs-01809937, HAL.
    7. Hanaki, Nobuyuki & Koriyama, Yukio & Sutan, Angela & Willinger, Marc, 2019. "The strategic environment effect in beauty contest games," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 587-610.
    8. Marco Battaglini & Salvatore Nunnari & Thomas R. Palfrey, 2016. "The Political Economy of Public Debt: A Laboratory Study," NBER Working Papers 22406, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Berentsen, Aleksander & McBride, Michael & Rocheteau, Guillaume, 2017. "Limelight on dark markets: Theory and experimental evidence on liquidity and information," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 70-90.
    10. Duersch, Peter & Eife, Thomas A., 2019. "Price competition in an inflationary environment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 48-66.
    11. Eloisa Campioni & Vittorio Larocca & Loredana Mirra & Luca Panaccione, 2017. "Financial literacy and bank runs: an experimental analysis," CEIS Research Paper 402, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 07 Jul 2017.
    12. Jasmina Arifovic & George Evans & Olena Kostyshyna, 2013. "Are Sunspots Learnable? An Experimental Investigation in a Simple General-Equilibrium Model," Staff Working Papers 13-14, Bank of Canada.
    13. Thomas Meissner, 2013. "Intertemporal Consumption and Debt Aversion:An Experimental Study," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2013-045, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    14. Ferruccio Ponzano & Roberto Ricciuti, 2018. "Growth and Inequality in an Experimental AK Model," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 4(2), pages 313-330, July.
    15. Cortney Rodet & Andrew Smyth, 2018. "Experimental Evidence on the Cyclicality of Investment," Working Papers 18-02, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.
    16. William Luther, 2016. "Mises and the moderns on the inessentiality of money in equilibrium," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 1-13, March.
    17. Artidiatun Adji & James Alm & Paul J. Ferraro, 2009. "Experimental tests of Ricardian equivalence with distortionary versus nondistortionary taxes," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(4), pages 2556-2572.
    18. Alexander Salter & Solomon Stein, 2016. "Endogenous currency formation in an online environment: The case of Diablo II," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 53-66, March.
    19. Enrica Carbone & John Hey & Tibor Neugebauer, 2018. "An Experimental Comparison of Two Exchange Mechanisms, An Asset Market versus a Credit Market," Discussion Papers 18/08, Department of Economics, University of York.

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