IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/h/nbr/nberch/3513.html
   My bibliography  Save this book chapter

Introduction to "The Effect of Education on Efficiency in Consumption"

In: The Effect of Education on Efficiency in Consumption

Author

Listed:
  • Robert T. Michael

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert T. Michael, 1972. "Introduction to "The Effect of Education on Efficiency in Consumption"," NBER Chapters,in: The Effect of Education on Efficiency in Consumption, pages 3-6 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:3513
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/chapters/c3513.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lange, Mark Dale, 1979. "An economic analysis of time allocation and capitol-labor ratios in household production of farm families in Iowa," ISU General Staff Papers 197901010800008285, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    2. Walter McMahon, 1998. "Conceptual Framework for the Analysis of the Social Benefits of Lifelong Learnings," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 309-346.
    3. James J. Heckman, 2015. "Introduction to A Theory of the Allocation of Time by Gary Becker," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(583), pages 403-409, March.
    4. repec:eee:labchp:v:1:y:1986:i:c:p:273-304 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. O'Sullivan, Vincent, 2012. "The Long Term Health Effects of Education," Papers WP429, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    6. Grossman, Michael & Joyce, Theodore J, 1990. "Unobservables, Pregnancy Resolutions, and Birth Weight Production Functions in New York City," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 983-1007, October.
    7. M.A. Marais, 1993. "The Consumption Benefits of Education," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 93-06, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    8. Ariel Kalil & Rebecca Ryan & Michael Corey, 2012. "Diverging Destinies: Maternal Education and the Developmental Gradient in Time With Children," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 49(4), pages 1361-1383, November.
    9. Fabra, M. Eugenia & Camisón, Cesar, 2009. "Direct and indirect effects of education on job satisfaction: A structural equation model for the Spanish case," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 600-610, October.
    10. Chiriboga, Douglas A. & Willis, Cleve E., 1977. "Human Capital And The Engel Curve For Health Insurance," Northeastern Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 6(1:), April.
    11. Bender, Ruth Larson, 1984. "Habitat characteristics and pheasant hunting participation: a household production function application," ISU General Staff Papers 1984010108000017521, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    12. Hu, Baiding & McAleer, Michael, 1997. "A probit analysis of consumer behaviour in rural China," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 527-534.
    13. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0600-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Humberto Llavador & John E. Roemer & Joaquim Silvestre, 2013. "Should we sustain? And if so, sustain what? Consumption or the quality of life?," Chapters,in: Handbook on Energy and Climate Change, chapter 30, pages 639-665 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    15. Grossman, Michael, 2004. "The demand for health, 30 years later: a very personal retrospective and prospective reflection," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 629-636, July.
    16. M.A. Marais, 1992. "The Funding of Tertiary Education in New Zealand," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 92-26, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    17. M.A. Marais, 1993. "The Theoretical Case for a Voucher Scheme in South Africa," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 93-01, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
    18. Rodolfo Nayga, 2000. "Schooling, health knowledge and obesity," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(7), pages 815-822.
    19. Michael Grossman, 1976. "The Correlation between Health and Schooling," NBER Chapters,in: Household Production and Consumption, pages 147-224 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. Philippe Cazenave, 1976. "Pour une nouvelle analyse économique de la demande de formation," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 27(1), pages 54-84.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:3513. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.