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A poverty line contingent on reference groups: implications for the extent of poverty in some Asian countries

In: The Asian ‘Poverty Miracle’

Author

Listed:
  • Satya R. Chakravarty
  • Nachiketa Chattopadhyay
  • Jacques Silber

Abstract

This chapter estimates the number of poor in various countries in Asia by applying an ‘amalgam poverty line’, which is a weighted average of an absolute poverty line (such as $1.25 per day or $1.45 per day) and a reference income (such as the mean or the median income). The number of poor is computed under various values of the weight applied to the absolute poverty line, namely 100 percent, 90 percent, 66 percent and 50 percent. The chapter provides estimates of the headcount ratio and poverty gap ratio under the various scenarios for 25 different countries or regions examined.

Suggested Citation

  • Satya R. Chakravarty & Nachiketa Chattopadhyay & Jacques Silber, 2016. "A poverty line contingent on reference groups: implications for the extent of poverty in some Asian countries," Chapters,in: The Asian ‘Poverty Miracle’, chapter 2, pages 30-50 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:17203_2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Fafchamps, Marcel & Shilpi, Forhad, 2008. "Subjective welfare, isolation, and relative consumption," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 43-60, April.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asian Studies; Development Studies; Economics and Finance;

    JEL classification:

    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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