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The demand for military expenditure

In: Handbook of Defense Economics

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  • Smith, Ron

Abstract

This chapter provides an analytical survey of models explaining the level of military expenditure, emphasizing empirical econometric models based on optimizing behavior. After setting out the standard neo-classical model in which nation states are represented as rational agents maximizing a welfare function depending on security and economic variables subject to a budget constraint, the chapter considers: criticisms of this model, alternative theoretical specifications, data and measurement issues, alternative econometric approaches and reviews selected studies.

Suggested Citation

  • Smith, Ron, 1995. "The demand for military expenditure," Handbook of Defense Economics,in: Keith Hartley & Todd Sandler (ed.), Handbook of Defense Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 69-87 Elsevier.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hdechp:1-04
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    Cited by:

    1. Collier, Paul & Hoeffler, Anke, 2002. "Military expenditure - threats, aid, and arms races," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2927, The World Bank.
    2. Christos Kollias & Suzanna-Maria Paleologou, 2003. "Domestic political and external security determinants of the demand for greek military expenditure," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 437-445.
    3. J. Paul Dunne & Sam Perlo-Freeman, 2003. "The demand for military spending in developing countries: A dynamic panel analysis," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 461-474.
    4. Vincenzo Bove & Roberto Nisticò, 2014. "Coups d’état and defense spending: a counterfactual analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 161(3), pages 321-344, December.
    5. Aamer S. Abu-Qarn & J Paul Dunne & Yasmine M. Abdelfattah & Shadwa Zaher, 2010. "The Demand for Military Spending in Egypt," Working Papers 1001, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    6. J. Paul Dunne & Eftychia Nikolaidou & Nikolaos Mylonidis, 2003. "The demand for military spending in the peripheral economies of Europe," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(6), pages 447-460.
    7. Enrico Spolaore, 2004. "Economic Integration, International Conflict and Political Unions," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 94(5), pages 3-50, September.

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