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Doing Business 2012 : Doing Business in a More Transparent World

Author

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  • International Finance Corporation
  • World Bank

Abstract

Ninth in a series of annual reports comparing business regulations in 183 economies, Doing Business 2012 measures regulations affecting 11 areas of everyday business activity: • starting a business • dealing with construction permits • employing workers • registering property • getting credit • protecting investors • paying taxes • trading across borders • enforcing contracts • closing a business • getting electricity The report updates all indicators as of June 1, 2011, ranks countries on their overall "ease of doing business", and analyzes reforms to business regulation—identifying which countries are strengthening their business environment the most. Doing Business 2012 includes a new set of indicators on the time, steps, and cost for a private business to get an electricity connection. The data on connection services can inform utilities, regulators and governments seeking to strengthen the performance of the electricity sector. Drawing on a now longer time series, this year's report introduces a measure to illustrate how the regulatory environment for business has changed in each economy since Doing Business 2006 was published in 2005. A new "distance to frontier" measure complements the aggregate ranking on the ease of doing business, which benchmarks each economy's current performance on the indicators against that of all other economies in the sample for a given year. A fundamental premise of Doing Business is that economic activity requires good rules that are transparent and accessible to all. Such regulations should be efficient, striking a balance between safeguarding some important aspects of the business environment and avoiding distortions that impose unreasonable costs on businesses. Where business regulation is burdensome and competition limited, success depends more on whom you know than on what you can do. But where regulations are relatively easy to comply with and accessible to all who need to use them, anyone with talent and a good idea should be able to start and grow a business in the formal sector. “The Doing Business report, which was started in 2003, has become one of the key ways in which the bank and other observers gauge business climate within developing countries...” -- The Financial Times “[Doing Business started] as a way to encourage countries to reduce obstacles to entrepreneurship. Developing countries compete to land a spot on the top 10 list of most-improving countries because it is seen as a way to get attention and investment.” -- The Wall Street Journal “[Doing Business] has succeeded in putting the issue of business red tape on the international political agenda.” -- The Economist

Suggested Citation

  • International Finance Corporation & World Bank, 2012. "Doing Business 2012 : Doing Business in a More Transparent World," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 5907, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:5907
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    File URL: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/bitstream/handle/10986/5907/DB12-FullReport.pdf?sequence=1
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    Cited by:

    1. Aboal, Diego & Noya, Nelson & Rius, Andrés, 2014. "Contract Enforcement and Investment: A Systematic Review of the Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 322-338.
    2. Zuzana Novotná & Petra Šánová & Adriana Laputková, 2016. "Evaluation of the Quality of Governance in African Countries using Aggregate Indicators," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(2), pages 682-687.
    3. repec:elg:eechap:15325_21 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Nguyen, Tuan & Locke, Stuart & Reddy, Krishna, 2015. "Does boardroom gender diversity matter? Evidence from a transitional economy," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 184-202.
    5. Chris Nyland & Charmine E.J. Härtel & Thin Vu & Cherrie Jiuhua Zhu, 2015. "Hospital Numerical Flexibility and Nurse Economic Security in China and India," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 53(1), pages 136-158, March.
    6. Toman Barsbai & Hillel Rapoport & Andreas Steinmayr & Christoph Trebesch, 2017. "The Effect of Labor Migration on the Diffusion of Democracy: Evidence from a Former Soviet Republic," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 36-69, July.
    7. Richard Fabling & David C. Maré, 2012. "Cyclical Labour Market Adjustment in New Zealand: The Response of Firms to the Global Financial Crisis and its Implications for Workers," Working Papers 12_04, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
    8. Mohamed Ali Marouani & Rim Mouelhi, 2016. "Contribution of Structural Change to Productivity Growth: Evidence from Tunisia," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 25(1), pages 110-132.
    9. Ayelazuno, Jasper, 2014. "Oil wealth and the well-being of the subaltern classes in Sub-Saharan Africa: A critical analysis of the resource curse in Ghana," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 66-73.
    10. Wasseem Mina, 2014. "United Arab Emirates FDI Outlook," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(12), pages 1716-1730, December.
    11. World Bank, 2012. "Papua New Guinea : Country Gender Assessment, 2011-2012," World Bank Other Operational Studies 16513, The World Bank.
    12. Ndonga Dennis, 2013. "Increasing Africa’s Share of Vertical Investments through Single Window Systems," The Law and Development Review, De Gruyter, vol. 6(2), pages 181-215, August.
    13. Kalyvas, Antonios Nikolaos & Mamatzakis, Emmanuel, 2017. "Do creditor rights and information sharing affect the performance of foreign banks?," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 13-35.
    14. World Bank, 2012. "Iraq Investment Climate Assessment 2012," World Bank Other Operational Studies 28566, The World Bank.
    15. Predrag D. Radojevic & Darko Marjanovic & Tatjana Radovanov, 2014. "The Impact of Firms’ Characteristics on Export Barriers’ Perception: A Case of Serbian Exporters," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2014(4), pages 426-445.
    16. Arch G. Woodside & Man-Ling Chang & Cheng-Feng Cheng, 2012. "Government Regulations of Business, Corruption, Reforms, and the Economic Growth of Nations," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 11(2), pages 127-142, December.
    17. Calcagnini, Giorgio & Travaglini, Giuseppe, 2014. "A time series analysis of labor productivity. Italy versus the European countries and the U.S," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 622-628.
    18. Belkhir, Mohamed & Maghyereh, Aktham & Awartani, Basel, 2016. "Institutions and corporate capital structure in the MENA region," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 99-129.

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