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Helping Working Families: The Earned Income Tax Credit

Author

Listed:
  • Saul D. Hoffman

    (University of Delaware)

  • Laurence S. Seidman

    (University of Delaware)

Abstract

Hoffman and Seidman offer a complete assessment of the EITC in which they analyze, evaluate, summarize, and critique the state of the program. The authors find that, overall, the EITC works well, and that it has earned its political popularity. Yet they also uncover several problem areas that they address with specific recommendations based on their analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Saul D. Hoffman & Laurence S. Seidman, 2003. "Helping Working Families: The Earned Income Tax Credit," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number hwf, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:upj:ubooks:hwf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Midgley, James & Stewart, Kitty & Piachaud, David & Glennerster, Howard, 2008. "Welfare reform in the United States: implications for British social policy," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6192, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Gregory Acs & Eric Toder, 2007. "Should we subsidize work? Welfare reform, the earned income tax credit and optimal transfers," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 14(3), pages 327-343, June.
    3. David Neumark & William Wascher, 2011. "Does a Higher Minimum Wage Enhance the Effectiveness of the Earned Income Tax Credit?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 64(4), pages 712-746, July.
    4. Bruce D. Meyer, 2010. "The Effects of the Earned Income Tax Credit and Recent Reforms," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 24, pages 153-180 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Guillermo E. Perry & William F. Maloney & Omar S. Arias & Pablo Fajnzylber & Andrew D. Mason & Jaime Saavedra-Chanduvi, 2007. "Informality : Exit and Exclusion," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6730.
    6. Andrew Leigh & Roger Wilkins, 2009. "Working Credits: A Low-Cost Alternative to Earned Income Tax Credits?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n07, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    7. repec:ces:ifodic:v:3:y:2005:i:2:p:14567642 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Leigh Andrew, 2010. "Who Benefits from the Earned Income Tax Credit? Incidence among Recipients, Coworkers and Firms," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-43, May.
    9. Laurence Seidman, 2013. "Overcoming the Fiscal Trilemma with Two Progressive Consumption Tax Supplements," Public Finance Review, , vol. 41(6), pages 824-851, November.
    10. Rebecca M. Blank, 2005. "An Overview of Welfare-to-Work Efforts," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 3(2), pages 03-07, 07.
    11. repec:cep:sticas:/131 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Kenneth A. Couch & Douglas J. Besharov & David Neumark, 2013. "Spurring Job Creation in Response to Severe Recessions: Reconsidering Hiring Credits," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(1), pages 142-171, January.
    13. Saul D. Hoffman, 2008. "The Changing Impact of Marriage and Children on Women’s Labor Force Participation," Working Papers 08-19, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
    14. Amanda Y. Agan & Michael D. Makowsky, 2018. "The Minimum Wage, EITC, and Criminal Recidivism," Working Papers 616, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    15. Reagan Baughman & Stacy Dickert-Conlin, 2009. "The earned income tax credit and fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 22(3), pages 537-563, July.
    16. James Midgley, 2008. "Welfare Reform in the United States: Implications for British Social Policy (with commentaries by Kitty Stewart, David Piachaud and Howard Glennerster)," CASE Papers case131, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    17. Nicole Simpson & Jill Tiefenthaler & Jameson Hyde, 2010. "The Impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit on Economic Well-Being: A Comparison Across Household Types," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(6), pages 843-864, December.
    18. Lane Kenworthy, 2008. "Government Benefits, Inequality and Employment," LIS Working papers 472, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    19. Lane Kenworthy, 2015. "Do employment-conditional earnings subsidies work?," ImPRovE Working Papers 15/10, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    earned income tax credit; eitc; tax credit;

    JEL classification:

    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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