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China's Growing Role in World Trade

Editor

Listed:
  • Feenstra, Robert C.
  • Wei, Shang-Jin

Abstract

In less than three decades, China has grown from playing a negligible role in international trade to being one of the world's largest exporters, a substantial importer of raw materials, intermediate outputs, and other goods, and both a recipient and source of foreign investment. Not surprisingly, China's economic dynamism has generated considerable attention and concern in the United States and beyond. While some analysts have warned of the potential pitfalls of China's rise—the loss of jobs, for example—others have highlighted the benefits of new market and investment opportunities for US firms. Bringing together an expert group of contributors, China's Growing Role in World Trade undertakes an empirical investigation of the effects of China's new status. The essays collected here provide detailed analyses of the microstructure of trade, the macroeconomic implications, sector-level issues, and foreign direct investment. This volume's careful examination of micro data in light of established economic theories clarifies a number of misconceptions, disproves some conventional wisdom, and documents data patterns that enhance our understanding of China's trade and what it may mean to the rest of the world.

Suggested Citation

  • Feenstra, Robert C. & Wei, Shang-Jin (ed.), 2010. "China's Growing Role in World Trade," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226239712, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:bknber:9780226239712
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. ZHANG Hongyong, 2015. "Explaining the International Mobility of Chinese Workers, 1992-2012," Discussion papers 15045, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    2. ZHANG Hongyong & ZHU Lianming, 2015. "Effect of Foreign Affiliates on Exporting and Markups," Discussion papers 15127, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Thorbecke, Willem, 2015. "China–US trade: A global outlier," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 47-58.
    4. Fan, Peilei, 2018. "Catching Up in Economic Transition: Innovation in the People’s Republic of China and India," ADBI Working Papers 809, Asian Development Bank Institute.
    5. Frankel, Jeffrey, 2016. "Globalization and Chinese Growth: Ends of Trends?," Working Paper Series 16-029, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    6. Sandra PONCET & Laura HERING & José DE SOUSA, 2015. "Has trade openness reduced pollution in China?," Working Papers P132, FERDI.
    7. Pritish K. Sahu, 2016. "Malaysia’s Domestic Value Added Export: The Role of Governance and Strategic Policy Reforms," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(4), pages 1578-1584.
    8. Lin, Faqin & Hu, Cui & Fuchs, Andreas, 2016. "How Do Firms Respond to Political Tensions? The Heterogeneity of the Dalai Lama Effect on Trade," Working Papers 0628, University of Heidelberg, Department of Economics.
    9. Riccardo Fiorentini & Guido Montani, 2012. "The New Global Political Economy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14443.
    10. Shang-Jin Wei & Zhuan Xie & Xiaobo Zhang, 2017. "From "Made in China" to "Innovated in China": Necessity, Prospect, and Challenges," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(1), pages 49-70, Winter.
    11. Hamilton, Gary, 2012. "Interview with Professor Gary Hamilton," economic sociology_the european electronic newsletter, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, vol. 13(3), pages 34-39.
    12. Mallick, Sushanta & Marques, Helena, 2016. "Pricing strategy of emerging market exporters in alternate currency regimes: The role of comparative advantage," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 68-81.
    13. Boeing, Philipp, 2014. "China's R&D subsidies: Allocation and effectiveness," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-103, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    14. Hu, Cui & Lin, Faqin & Tan, Yong & Tang, Yihong, 2017. "How Exporting Firms Respond to Technical Barriers to Trade?," MPRA Paper 80946, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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