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The Fatal Conceit


  • Bartley, III, W. W.


  • Hayek, F. A.


Hayek gives the main arguments for the free-market case and presents his manifesto on the "errors of socialism." Hayek argues that socialism has, from its origins, been mistaken on factual, and even on logical, grounds and that its repeated failures in the many different practical applications of socialist ideas that this century has witnessed were the direct outcome of these errors. He labels as the "fatal conceit" the idea that "man is able to shape the world around him according to his wishes." "The achievement of The Fatal Conceit is that it freshly shows why socialism must be refuted rather than merely dismissed—then refutes it again."—David R. Henderson, Fortune . "Fascinating. . . . The energy and precision with which Mr. Hayek sweeps away his opposition is impressive."—Edward H. Crane, Wall Street Journal F. A. Hayek is considered a pioneer in monetary theory, the preeminent proponent of the libertarian philosophy, and the ideological mentor of the Reagan and Thatcher "revolutions."

Suggested Citation

  • Hayek, F. A., 2018. "The Fatal Conceit," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226320663 edited by Bartley, III, W. W., March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:bkecon:9780226320663

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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Erik O. Kimbrough & Alexander Vostroknutov, 2012. "Rules, Rule-Following, and Cooperation," Discussion Papers dp12-15, Department of Economics, Simon Fraser University.
    2. Christopher Coyne, 2009. "The politics and economics of global interventionism," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 22(2), pages 181-191, June.
    3. Stuart Levy & Donald Hawkins, 2009. "Peace Through Tourism: Commerce Based Principles and Practices," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 89(4), pages 569-585, March.
    4. Deepak Lal, 1993. "Poverty and Development," UCLA Economics Working Papers 707, UCLA Department of Economics.
    5. Zweynert, Joachim, 2013. "Social market economy in Germany as an attempt to overcome the totalitarian past," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, pages 74-90, August.
    6. Peter J. Boettke & Christopher J. Coyne & Peter T. Leeson, 2015. "Institutional stickiness and the New Development Economics," Chapters,in: Culture and Economic Action, chapter 6, pages 123-146 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. repec:arp:ijwpds:2016:p:55-60 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Göbel, Jürgen, 2009. "Hayek’s approach to cognitive and social order," MPRA Paper 14290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Asoni, Andrea, 2008. "Colonial Heritage and Economic Development," Working Paper Series 758, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    10. Emily Chamlee-Wright & Justus Myers, 2008. "Discovery and social learning in non-priced environments: An Austrian view of social network theory," The Review of Austrian Economics, Springer;Society for the Development of Austrian Economics, vol. 21(2), pages 151-166, September.
    11. Horst Feldmann, 2009. "The quality of the legal system and labor market performance around the world," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 39-65, August.

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