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The Post-Keynesian Approach to Economics

Author

Listed:
  • Philip Arestis

Abstract

This major new book provides a coherent critique of the neo-classical synthesis together with a comprehensive and systematic introduction to the post-Keynesian alternatives. Professor Arestis demonstrates that post-Keynesian economics offers a challenge to conventional neo-classical economics. He argues that although post-Keynesianism is not problem-free, it nevertheless offers a more satisfactory explanation of ‘real’ phenomena.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Arestis, 1992. "The Post-Keynesian Approach to Economics," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 16, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eebook:16
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    File URL: http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/isbn/9781852781545
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael J. Radzicki, 2003. "Mr. Hamilton, Mr. Forrester, and a Foundation for Evolutionary Economics," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 133-173, March.
    2. Robert Prasch, 2003. "Are economists amoral? Contemporary economic thought and the distinction between values and prices," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 13-22, January.
    3. Freeman, Alan, 1996. "Ernest Mandel's Contribution to Economic Dynamics," MPRA Paper 64974, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 30 Nov 1996.
    4. Levent, Korap, 2006. "An empirical analysis of Turkish inflation (1988-2004): some non-monetarist estimations," MPRA Paper 19630, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Paul Downward, 1995. "A Post Keynesian Perspective of U.K. Manufacturing Pricing," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(3), pages 403-426, March.
    6. Clive L Spash & Heinz Schandl, 2009. "Growth, the Environment and Keynes: Reflections on Two Heterodox Schools of Thought," Socio-Economics and the Environment in Discussion (SEED) Working Paper Series 2009-01, CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems.
    7. Kunal Sen & Rajendra R. Vaidya, 1995. "The Determination of Industrial Prices in India: A Post Keynesian Approach," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 29-52, September.
    8. David Dequech, 1997. "Post Keynesian Economics: Debt, Distribution and the Macro Economy," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 872-875, September.
    9. Edward J. McKenna & Diane C. Zannoni, 1999. "Post Keynesian Economics and Critical Realism: A Reply to Parsons," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 57-70, September.
    10. Paul Dalziel, 1996. "The Keynesian Multiplier, Liquidity Preference, and Endogenous Money," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 311-331, March.
    11. Stephen D. Parsons, 1996. "Post Keynesian Realism and Keynes’ General Theory," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 419-441, March.
    12. Chris Doucouliagos, 1997. "Unemployment and Workers' Control," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2), pages 151-179.
    13. David Dequech, 2012. "Post Keynesianism, Heterodoxy and Mainstream Economics," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 353-368, April.
    14. Annina Kaltenbrunner, 2018. "Financialised internationalisation and structural hierarchies: a mixed-method study of exchange rate determination in emerging economies," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 42(5), pages 1315-1341.
    15. Murray, Michael/ M J, 2011. "A critical perspective on heterodox production modeling," MPRA Paper 34255, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Gordon Fletcher, 2006. "Regulating the Role of Money in Robertsonian Economics," Working Papers 200620, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    17. Sheila C. Dow, 1999. "Post Keynesianism and Critical Realism: What Is the Connection?," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 15-33, September.
    18. Ingrid Harvold Kvangraven & Surbhi Kesar, 2021. "Standing in the Way of Rigor? Economics’ Meeting with the Decolonizing Agenda," Working Papers 2110, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
    19. Loaiza Quintero, O.L., 2011. "La demanda agregada y la distribución del ingreso: Un estudio a partir de los modelos de crecimiento kaleckianos [Aggregate Demand and Income Distribution: A Kaleckian Growth Model Approach]," MPRA Paper 42667, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 01 Apr 2011.
    20. Gordon Fletcher, 2006. "In Search of Dennis Robertson: Through the Looking Glass and What I Found There," Working Papers 200621, University of Liverpool, Department of Economics.
    21. Ho, Peter, 2018. "A theorem on dynamic disequilibrium: Debunking path dependence and equilibrium via China’s urban property (1949–1998)," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 863-875.
    22. Milan Sojka, 2010. "Monetární politika evropské centrální banky a její teoretická východiska pohledem postkeynesovské ekonomie [Monetary Policy of the European Central Bank and Its Theoretical Resources in the View of," Politická ekonomie, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2010(1), pages 3-19.
    23. Maks Tajnikar & Nina Ponikvar, 2006. "National Accounts Data and Macroeconomic Analysis: A Comparative Study of the Czech Republic, Germany, Greece, Ireland and Slovenia," Prague Economic Papers, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2006(2), pages 135-155.
    24. Loaiza Quintero, Osmar Leandro & Sierra Ríos, Ana Milena, 2010. "Salarios, demanda agregada y desempeño económico en Colombia: un debate no resuelto [Wages, aggregate demand and economic performance in Colombia: an unsolved debate]," MPRA Paper 42669, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    25. David Dequech, 2001. "Bounded Rationality, Institutions, and Uncertainty," Journal of Economic Issues, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(4), pages 911-929, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics and Finance;

    JEL classification:

    • B5 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches

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