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Economic Development in the Americas since 1500

Author

Listed:
  • Engerman,Stanley L.
  • Sokoloff,Kenneth L.

Abstract

This book brings together a number of previously published articles by Stanley L. Engerman and Kenneth L. Sokoloff. Its essays deal with differences in the rates of economic growth in Latin American and mainland North America, specifically the United States and Canada. It demonstrates how relative differences in growth over time are related to differences in the institutions that developed in different economies. This variation is driven by differences in major institutions – suffrage, education, tax policy, land and immigration policy, and banking and financial organizations. These factors, in turn, are all related to differences in endowments, climate and natural resources. Providing a comprehensive treatment of its topic, the essays have been revised to reflect new developments and research.

Suggested Citation

  • Engerman,Stanley L. & Sokoloff,Kenneth L., 2012. "Economic Development in the Americas since 1500," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107009554.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9781107009554
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    Cited by:

    1. Aidt, Toke S. & Jensen, Peter S., 2014. "Workers of the world, unite! Franchise extensions and the threat of revolution in Europe, 1820–1938," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 52-75.
    2. Sambit Bhattacharyya & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2016. "Distributional Consequences of Commodity Price Shocks: Australia Over A Century," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 62(2), pages 223-244, June.
    3. Williamson, Jeffrey G, 2013. "Demographic Dividends Revisited," CEPR Discussion Papers 9390, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Nikolaev, Boris & Boudreaux, Christopher & Salahodjaev, Rauf, 2017. "Are individualistic societies less equal? Evidence from the parasite stress theory of values," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 30-49.
    5. Sambit Bhattacharyya & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2013. "Distributional Impact of Commodity Price Shocks: Australia over a Century," OxCarre Working Papers 117, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    6. Nestor Garza, 2016. "Primate cities in Latin America: a theoretical framework based upon intra-urban driving forces," International Journal of Urban Sciences, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 241-259, July.
    7. Daniel L. Bennett & Hugo J. Faria & James D. Gwartney & Hugo M. Montesinos-Yufa & Daniel R. Morales & Carlos E. Navarro, 2017. "Evidence on economic versus political institutions as determinants of development," Working Papers 2017-04, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
    8. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2015. "Latin American Inequality: Colonial Origins, Commodity Booms or a Missed Twentieth-Century Leveling?," Journal of Human Development and Capabilities, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 324-341, August.
    9. repec:taf:femeco:v:23:y:2017:i:2:p:33-67 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Williamson, Jeffrey G, 2013. "The Commodity Export, Growth, and Distribution Connection in Southeast Asia 1500-1940," CEPR Discussion Papers 9364, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Nunn, Nathan & Trefler, Daniel, 2014. "Domestic Institutions as a Source of Comparative Advantage," Handbook of International Economics, Elsevier.
    12. Andersson, Jens & Berger, Thor, 2016. "Elites and the Expansion of Education in 19th-century Sweden," Lund Papers in Economic History 149, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    13. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2015. "Latin American Inequality: Colonial Origins, Commodity Booms, or a Missed 20th Century Leveling?," NBER Working Papers 20915, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Frederik Toscani, 2013. "Why High Human Capital Makes Good Revolutionaries: The Role of the Middle Classes in Democratisation," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1332, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    15. Pastor, Manuel & Wise, Carol, 2015. "Good-Bye financial crash, hello financial eclecticism: Latin American responses to the 2008–09 global financial crisis," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 200-217.
    16. Simon Ville, 2015. "Divergence and Convergence: New and Shifting Paradigms in Comparative Economic History," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 55(1), pages 80-94, March.
    17. Faria, Hugo J. & Montesinos-Yufa, Hugo M. & Morales, Daniel R. & Navarro, Carlos E., 2016. "Unbundling the roles of human capital and institutions in economic development," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 45(S), pages 108-128.
    18. Bernardita Escobar Andrae, 2015. "Female entrepreneurship and participation rates in 19th century Chile," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 42(2 Year 20), pages 67-91, December.
    19. Stephen H. Haber & Aldo Musacchio, 2013. "These Are the Good Old Days: Foreign Entry and the Mexican Banking System," NBER Working Papers 18713, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    20. repec:eee:ehbiol:v:26:y:2017:i:c:p:126-136 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Raluca Iorgulescu, 2015. "Human Capital, The Digital Divide, And The Possible Connection To The Flow-Fund Analysis Of Socioeconomic Metabolism," Annals - Economy Series, Constantin Brancusi University, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1, pages 5-16, January.

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