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Allocation in the European Emissions Trading Scheme

Editor

Listed:
  • Ellerman,A. Denny
  • Buchner,Barbara K.
  • Carraro,Carlo

Abstract

A critical issue in dealing with climate change is deciding who has a right to emit carbon dioxide. Allocation in the European Emissions Trading Scheme provided the first in-depth description and analysis of the process by which rights to emit carbon dioxide were created and distributed in the European Union. This was the world's first large-scale experiment with an emission trading system for carbon dioxide and was likely to be copied by others if there was to be a global regime for limiting greenhouse gas emissions. The book comprises contributions from those responsible for putting the allocation into practice in ten representative member states and at the European Commission. The problems encountered in this process, the solutions found, and the choices they made, will be of interest to all who are concerned with climate policy and the use of emissions trading to combat climate change.

Suggested Citation

  • Ellerman,A. Denny & Buchner,Barbara K. & Carraro,Carlo (ed.), 2007. "Allocation in the European Emissions Trading Scheme," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521875684, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521875684
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Li, M.W. & Li, Y.P. & Huang, G.H., 2011. "An interval-fuzzy two-stage stochastic programming model for planning carbon dioxide trading under uncertainty," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 5677-5689.
    2. Caparrós, Alejandro & Péreau, Jean-Christophe & Tazdaït, Tarik, 2013. "Emission trading and international competition: The impact of labor market rigidity on technology adoption and output," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 36-43.
    3. Hanley Nick & MacKenzie Ian A, 2010. "The Effects of Rent Seeking over Tradable Pollution Permits," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-26, July.
    4. Denny Ellerman, 2009. "The EU's Emissions Trading Scheme: A Proto-Type Global System?," EUI-RSCAS Working Papers 2, European University Institute (EUI), Robert Schuman Centre of Advanced Studies (RSCAS).
    5. Stefano F. Verde & Christoph Graf & Thijs Jong and Claudio Marcantonini, 2016. "Installation entries and exits in the EU ETS industrial sector," RSCAS Working Papers 2016/19, European University Institute.
    6. MacKenzie, Ian A. & Ohndorf, Markus, 2012. "Cap-and-trade, taxes, and distributional conflict," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 51-65.
    7. Jessika Richter & Luis Mundaca, 2015. "Achieving and maintaining institutional feasibility in emissions trading: the case of New Zealand," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 20(8), pages 1487-1509, December.
    8. A. Denny Ellerman & Claudio Marcantonini & Aleksandar Zaklan, 2016. "The European Union Emissions Trading System: Ten Years and Counting," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 10(1), pages 89-107.
    9. Antonio M. Bento & Emeric Henry & Scott E. Lowe, 2013. "The Determinants of Credit Allocations in a Market-based Trading System: Evidence from the RECLAIM Program," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 43(1), pages 51-80, Summer.
    10. Claudia Kettner, 2012. "EU Emissions Trading – Allocation Patterns and Trade Flows," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 85(9), pages 737-750, September.

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