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An Economic History of South Africa

Author

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  • Feinstein,Charles H.

Abstract

This book is the first economic history of South Africa in over sixty years. Professor Charles H. Feinstein offers an authoritative survey of five hundred years of South African economic history from the years preceding European settlements in 1652 through to the post-Apartheid era. He charts the early phase of slow growth, and then the transformation of the economy as a result of the discovery of diamonds and gold in the 1870s, followed by the rapid rise of industry in the wartime years. The final chapters cover the introduction of apartheid after 1948, and its consequences for economic performance. Special attention is given to the processes by which the black population were deprived of their land, and to the methods by which they were induced to supply labour for white farms, mines and factories. This book will be essential reading for students in economics, African history, imperial history and politics.

Suggested Citation

  • Feinstein,Charles H., 2005. "An Economic History of South Africa," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521850919, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521850919
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daron Acemoglu, 2006. "Modeling Inefficient Institutions," NBER Working Papers 11940, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Johan Fourie & Jan Luiten Zanden, 2013. "GDP in the Dutch Cape Colony: The National Accounts of a Slave-Based Society," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 81(4), pages 467-490, December.
    3. Leandro Prados de la Escosura, 2010. "Improving Human Development: A Long-Run View," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(5), pages 841-894, December.
    4. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro, 2013. "Human development in Africa: A long-run perspective," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 179-204.
    5. Johan Fourie & Dieter von Fintel, 2010. "The dynamics of inequality in a newly settled, pre-industrial society: the case of the Cape Colony," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 4(3), pages 229-267, October.
    6. Facundo Alvaredo & Anthony B Atkinson, 2010. "Colonial Rule, Apartheid and Natural Resources: Top Incomes in South Africa 1903-2005," OxCarre Working Papers 046, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, University of Oxford.
    7. repec:bla:devpol:v:36:y:2018:i:s2:p:o769-o785 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. McCloskey, Deirdre Nansen, 2009. "Slavery and Imperialism Did Not Enrich Europe," MPRA Paper 20696, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Potgieter, Petrus H., 2010. "Water and energy in South Africa – managing scarcity," MPRA Paper 23360, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Bakker, Jan David & Parsons, Christopher & Rauch, Ferdinand, 2016. "Migration and Urbanisation in Post-Apartheid South Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 10113, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    11. Johan Fourie, 2011. "Slaves as capital investment in the Dutch Cape Colony, 1652-1795," Working Papers 21/2011, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    12. Stanley L. Engerman & Kenneth L. Sokoloff, 2008. "Once Upon a Time in the Americas: Land and Immigration Policies in the New World," NBER Chapters, in: Understanding Long-Run Economic Growth: Geography, Institutions, and the Knowledge Economy, pages 13-48, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. repec:rss:jnljse:v3i1p3 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Kris Inwood & Oliver Masakure, 2013. "Poverty and Physical Well-being among the Coloured Population in South Africa," Economic History of Developing Regions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 28(2), pages 56-82, December.
    15. Daron Acemoglu & James A. Robinson, 2015. "The Rise and Decline of General Laws of Capitalism," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(1), pages 3-28, Winter.
    16. Hermann Giliomee, 2009. "A Note On Bantu Education, 1953 To 1970," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 77(1), pages 190-198, March.
    17. Grietjie Verhoef, 2011. ""Global since Gold" The Globalisation of Conglomerates: Explaining the Experience from South Africa, 1990 - 2009," Working Papers 238, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    18. Broadberry, Stephen & Gardner, Leigh, 2014. "African economic growth in a European mirror: a historical perspective," Economic History Working Papers 56493, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

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