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The Legacy of Scholasticism in Economic Thought

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  • Langholm,Odd

Abstract

This book studies the development of ideas on freedom, coercion and power in the history of economic thought. It focuses on the exchange of goods and services and on terms of exchange (interest rates, prices and wages) and examines the nature of choice, that is, the state of the will of economic actors making exchange decisions. In a social context, anyone's range of choice is restricted by the choices made by others. The first to raise the question of the will in this economic context were the medieval scholastics, drawing on non-economic analytic models inherited from antiquity and mainly from Aristotle. From these origins, views on economic choice, coercion and power are recorded, as they gradually change over the centuries, until they manifest themselves in more contemporary disputes between different branches of institutional economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Langholm,Odd, 1998. "The Legacy of Scholasticism in Economic Thought," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521621595.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521621595
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    Cited by:

    1. Islahi, Abdul Azim, 2005. "Contributions of Muslim Scholars to the History of Economic Thought and Analysis upto 15th Century," MPRA Paper 53462, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Constant Mews & Ibrahim Abraham, 2007. "Usury and Just Compensation: Religious and Financial Ethics in Historical Perspective," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 72(1), pages 1-15, April.
    3. Munro, John H., 2002. "The medieval origins of the 'Financial Revolution': usury, rentes, and negotiablity," MPRA Paper 10925, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Sep 2002.
    4. Mark Koyama, 2008. "Evading the 'Taint of Usury' Complex Contracts and Segmented Capital Markets," Economics Series Working Papers 412, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. Munro, John H., 2007. "The usury doctrine and urban public finances in late-medieval Flanders (1220 - 1550): rentes (annuities), excise taxes, and income transfers from the poor to the rich," MPRA Paper 11012, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jan 2008.
    6. Drakopoulos, Stavros A. & Gotsis, George, 2003. "A Meta-theoretical Assessment of the Decline of Scholastic Economics," MPRA Paper 12876, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2004.
    7. Abdul Azim Islahi, 2014. "History of Islamic Economic Thought," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 16105.
    8. Nicholas Theocarakis, 2008. "Antipeponthos and reciprocity: the concept of equivalent exchange from Aristotle to Turgot," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 55(1), pages 29-44, April.
    9. Oscar De-Juan & Fabio Monsalve, 2006. "Morally ruled behaviour: The neglected contribution of Scholasticism," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 99-112.
    10. James S. CICARELLI, 2016. "Philosophical Origins of Seventeenth Century American Economic Thought," Journal of Economic and Social Thought, KSP Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 179-195, June.

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