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Agricultural Reform in China

Author

Listed:
  • Huang,Yiping

Abstract

Chinese agriculture has experienced some radical changes over the past twenty years. Following the successful introduction of the household production system in the early 1980s, difficulties were encountered in establishing a unified domestic agricultural market in the later 1980s and 1990s. Through a comprehensive analysis of the changes in the Chinese agricultural institutions between the late 1970s and the mid-1990s, this study attempts to provide some answers to the main questions presently facing the agricultural sector. It focuses on the key elements of the pre-reform agricultural institutions, reviews the ways these institutions were refashioned and assesses the resulting changes in agricultural development. The implications of different policy choices are carefully considered with the assistance of a computable general equilibrium model. The author argues that China should push forward with its market-oriented reform measures and introduce the rigours of international competition into the agricultural sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Huang,Yiping, 1998. "Agricultural Reform in China," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521620550, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521620550
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhangyue Zhou, 2010. "Achieving food security in China: past three decades and beyond," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(3), pages 251-275, September.
    2. Xiangfei Xin & Fu Qin, 2011. "Decomposition of agricultural labor productivity growth and its regional disparity in China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(1), pages 92-100, January.
    3. Han Sung Hun, 2005. "Report on Critical Dimensions and Problems of the North Korean Situation (1995 - 2004)," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-45, May.
    4. Gong, Binlei, 2020. "Agricultural productivity convergence in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    5. Giovanni Bigazzi, 2007. "The Role Of Agriculture In The Development Of The People’S Republic Of China," Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica 36/2007, Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia.
    6. Brummer, B. & Glauben, T. & Lu, W., 2006. "Policy reform and productivity change in Chinese agriculture: A distance function approach," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 61-79, October.
    7. Gong, Binlei, 2018. "Agricultural reforms and production in China: Changes in provincial production function and productivity in 1978–2015," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 18-31.
    8. Vu, Linh Hoang, 2012. "Vietnam’s Agricultural Productivity: A Malmquist Index Approach," MPRA Paper 94800, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Bruce, John W. & Li, Zongmin, 2009. "“Crossing the river while feeling the rocks”: Incremental land reform and its impact on rural welfare in China," IFPRI discussion papers 926, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Xiangfei Xin & Liu Xiaoyun, 2008. "Regional disparity of factor endowment and agricultural labor productivity in China," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 3(3), pages 380-409, September.
    11. Cheng, Fuzhi, 2008. "China: Shadow WTO agricultural domestic support notifications," IFPRI discussion papers 793, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Samuel Marden, 2016. "Family Size and the Demand for Sex Selection: Evidence From China," Working Paper Series 9016, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.
    13. Estrin, Andrew J., 1999. "The Impacts Of Self-Sufficiency Policies And Fiscal Decentralization On The Efficiency Of Grain Production In China," 1999 Annual meeting, August 8-11, Nashville, TN 21610, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    14. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Wing Thye Woo, "undated". "Understanding China'S Economic Performance," Department of Economics 97-04, California Davis - Department of Economics.
    15. Carter, Colin A. & Estrin, Andrew J., 2001. "Market Reforms Versus Structural Reforms in Rural China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 527-541, September.
    16. Samuel Marden, 2016. "Family Size and the Demand for Sex Selection: Evidence From China," Working Paper Series 09016, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    17. Han Paul S., 2004. "Report on Critical Dimensions and Problems of the North Korean Situation (1996-2004)," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(3), pages 1-43, December.
    18. Samuel Marden, 2016. "The agricultural roots of industrial development: ‘forward linkages’ in reform era China," Working Paper Series 09116, Department of Economics, University of Sussex Business School.
    19. Samuel Marden, 2016. "The agricultural roots of industrial development: ‘forward linkages’ in reform era China," Working Paper Series 9116, Department of Economics, University of Sussex.

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