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Technology and the Pursuit of Economic Growth

Author

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  • Mowery,David C.
  • Rosenberg,Nathan

Abstract

Technology's contribution to economic growth and competitiveness has been the subject of vigorous debate in recent years. This book demonstrates the importance of a historical perspective in understanding the role of technological innovation in the economy. The authors examine key episodes and institutions in the development of the U.S. research system and in the development of the research systems of other industrial economies. They argue that the large potential contributions of economics to the understanding of technology and economic growth have been constrained by the narrow theoretical framework employed within neoclassical economies. A richer framework, they believe, will support a more fruitful dialogue among economists, policymakers, and managers on the organization of public and private institutions for innovation. David Mowery is Associate Professor of Business and Public Policy at the School of Business Administration, University of California, Berkeley. Nathan S. Rosenberg is Fairleigh Dickinson Professor of Economics at Stanford University. He is the author of Inside the Black Box: Technology and Economics (CUP, 1983).

Suggested Citation

  • Mowery,David C. & Rosenberg,Nathan, 1991. "Technology and the Pursuit of Economic Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521389365, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521389365
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Coase, R H, 1976. "Adam Smith's Views of Man," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(3), pages 529-546, October.
    2. Conybeare, John A C & Murdoch, James C & Sandler, Todd, 1994. "Alternative Collective-Goods Models of Military Alliances: Theory and Empirics," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(4), pages 525-542, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Dirk Libaers, 2009. "Industry relationships of DoD-funded academics and institutional changes in the US university system," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 34(5), pages 474-489, October.
    2. Guajardo, Guillermo, 2009. "Between the Workshop and the State: Training Human Capital in Railroad Companies in Mexico and Chile, 1850-1930," MPRA Paper 16135, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Paolo Rizzi & Fabio Campanini & Serena Costa, 2012. "Hybrid Innovation. The Italian Machine Tool Industry Case," Symphonya. Emerging Issues in Management, University of Milano-Bicocca, issue 1 Innovat, pages 45-56.
    4. Stowsky, Jay, 2003. "Secrets or Shields to Share? New Dilemmas for Dual Use Technology Development and the Quest for Military and Commercial Advantage in the Digital Age," UCAIS Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, Working Paper Series qt89r4j908, UCAIS Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, UC Berkeley.
    5. Klein, Hans, 2001. "Technology push-over: defense downturns and civilian technology policy," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 937-951, June.
    6. Dai, Feng & Li, Pengpeng & Liang, Ling, 2016. "Long-term economic growth under environmental pressure: An optimal path," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 15-24.
    7. Fabio Campanini & Serena Costa & Paolo Rizzi, 2013. "The Machine Tool Industry in Italy: Industrial Innovations and Performances," DISCE - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali dises1391, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    8. Daniel F. Spulber, 2013. "How Do Competitive Pressures Affect Incentives to Innovate When There Is a Market for Inventions?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 121(6), pages 1007-1054.
    9. Maureen McKelvey, 2016. "Firms navigating through innovation spaces: a conceptualization of how firms search and perceive technological, market and productive opportunities globally," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 785-802, October.
    10. Stefano Brusoni & Keith Pavitt, 2003. "Problem solving and the co-ordination of innovative activities," SPRU Working Paper Series 93, SPRU - Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex.
    11. Nagaoka, Sadao & Motohashi, Kazuyuki & Goto, Akira, 2010. "Patent Statistics as an Innovation Indicator," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, Elsevier.

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