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Economic Growth and Distribution in China

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  • Lardy,Nicholas R.

Abstract

This study maintains that China's system of economic planning tends to mitigate the trade-off between economic growth and equity that has been found to prevail in the early stages of development in most less developed countries. The analysis focuses on the Chinese leadership's attempt to improve economic efficiency by decentralizing economic management without encouraging, as a consequence, increased economic inequality among different regions. By examining the budgetary and planning process, focusing in particular on the fiscal relations between the centre and the far-reaching degree of resource redistribution undertaken by the central government through its control of interprovincial and intersectoral resource transfers. Professor Lardy's analysis highlights the essential features of Chinese economic growth and relates these to the experience of both developing and Soviet-type economies.

Suggested Citation

  • Lardy,Nicholas R., 1978. "Economic Growth and Distribution in China," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521219044, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521219044
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    Cited by:

    1. Yanrui Wu, 2000. "Income disparity and convergence in China's regional economies," Chapters,in: China in the Global Economy, chapter 15 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Shujie Yao, 1999. "A Note on the Causal Factors of China's Famine in 1959-1961," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(6), pages 1365-1372, December.
    3. Yasheng Huang, 2001. "Economic Fragmentation and FDI in China," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 374, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Michael T. Rock, 2012. "What can Indonesia learn from China's industrial energy saving programs?," Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(1), pages 33-55, April.
    5. Iris Claus & Les Oxley & Chen Wang & Guanghua Wan & Dan Yang, 2014. "Income Inequality In The People'S Republic Of China: Trends, Determinants, And Proposed Remedies," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(4), pages 686-708, September.
    6. Tsui, Kai-yuen, 2006. "Forces Shaping China's Interprovincial Inequality," WIDER Working Paper Series 128, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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